Tag Archives: St.Vincent

What I’ve been reading and listening to: January

As I usually do in January, I read lots of articles about goal-setting, New Year’s Resolutions and productivity  – and have since completely forgotten all of it. I read a lot about climate change and sustainability, desperately wanting to do more to help my poor burning country and this world we share. Less Stuff was interesting but I didn’t learn anything new, and I must admit I only dipped into Grit – I’ll return to it though, I’m sure. It’s been a busy month with holiday time, work, getting ready for the new school year – oh, and I took part in an online book proposal writing course. I will submit a proposal based on my PhD research to a couple of publishers soon – so watch this space!

I read Ophelia at my (12.5 year old) daughter’s insistence. I enjoyed it and it’s reminded me that one day I’d like to write for this age group/market – middle school readers interested in history.

While I’m ambivalent about Peter FitzSimons’ style of writing, I was interested to read The Catalpa Rescue as it covers John Boyle O’Reilly’s story, which I wrote about during my undergrad degree.  I’m writing a short review of the book for the Rottnest Island Voluntary Guides newsletter, as some of the Catalpa drama took place off the coast of Rottnest, Western Australia. My Mum is a Guide and we both think this story would liven up one of the (already excellent!) free walking tours on the island.

I’m also writing a review of Mark Quintanilla’s An Irishman Life, which is an edited arrangement of the letter book of Michael Keane, the Irish-born Attorney-General of St Vincent in the 1780s. I’ve been waiting for the book for ages, as I drew extensively on Quintanilla’s scholarly articles about Keane and St Vincent in my PhD thesis.

In addition to reading during January, I enjoyed these podcasts:

  • Dolly Parton’s America – I binged this, such a fun and uplifting podcast.
  • History Watch– a few years old now, but there are some fascinating episodes for those interested in Caribbean history and the work of historians in the Caribbean.
  • AML Talk Show – (AML = Anti-money laundering) This interview series is hosted by a former colleague of mine from London. I particularly enjoyed the interview with Bill Browder, the author of Red Notice and driving force behind the Magnitsky Act.
  • Russia, If You’re Listening, series 3 from the ABC Australia. Fascinating and entertaining.

“The Paradise of the World:” conflict and society in the Caribbean

While doing some background research on the indigenous people of St.Vincent, I came across a great online exhibition on the King’s College London website. “The Paradise of the World:” conflict and society in the Caribbean” was originally held at KCL in 2011, but is now available as an online exhibition. This is such a great way to share resources and information—I love seeing exhibitions migrate from the real world to the online arena so that researchers can make use of the content for years afterwards.

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‘Chatoyer, the Chief of the Black Charaibes in St Vincent with his five wives,’ from Bryan Edwards, The history, civil and commercial, of the British colonies in the West Indies (London, 1807).

The exhibition drew largely upon the holdings of the historical library collection of the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office and explored the history of the Caribbean region from the sixteenth century to 1900. Because the exhibition is based on British documentation and literature, the exhibition clearly approaches the Caribbean form the perspective of British interaction with the region. The exhibition provides an overview of Britain’s relationship with Spain as it relates to the Caribbean, international rivalry, the sugar trade and revolts and revolution in Jamaica and Haiti. and the development of the sugar industry and trade. In relation to indigenous peoples in the Caribbean (which is how I stumbled across the exhibition), there is a very good overview of indigenous peoples of Guyana and St.Vincent as well as some material on Jacques Du Tetre’s interaction with indigenous people in the region and his writings. Finally, the exhibition covers emancipation, and nineteenth century Caribbean colonial life.

This exhibition would be very useful for introductory research on the Caribbean (particularly the British Caribbean), and it includes a number of primary sources such as books, artwork and documentation which are available online. Click here to go to the KCL exhibition.