Tag Archives: Reading

What I’ve been reading and listening to: March

Sunday 1 March feels like a year ago! That was the day my family explored a suburb of Sydney we’d never been to before (Haberfield) and vowed to explore more every couple of weeks… fast forward to 1 April and we’re staying home except for my local #walk20in20 and the occasional grocery shopping trip.

To reading though…I read a lot about the COVID19 pandemic for a couple of weeks, but am now limiting myself to one news fix per day.

My reading this month wasn’t that inspiring to be honest, but the trajectory is kind of interesting. I started with Lucy Treloar’s Wolfe Island, which is beautifully written, but got me down in a climate change/end of the world way. Little did I know a pandemic was just around the corner, to put my fear of the damage of climate change on the back burner!! Next was The War that Saved my Life which I read on my 12 year old’s recommendation. It was a nice change of pace from Treloar’s book (although the subject matter is quite sad). It was also illuminating to see what ‘the kids’ are reading about historical events these days.

I went to a bookshop to buy Dan Ziffer’s A Wunch of Bankers, couldn’t find it and picked up Too Big to Fail instead. I thought it’d be interesting to read about the last global financial fiasco, ten years down the track. I speed-read much of it (too much detail and breathless gossip) and now I can’t bring myself to finish it. I know how it ends, and now that we’re in the midst of another fiasco, I’ve lost interest!

A Different Kind of Subject is my nod to academic reading this month, which has been completely disrupted by all the upheaval of transiting to full-time work and school from home. Hunter’s book on colonial law in Aboriginal-European relations in 19th century Western Australia is really useful for the research I’m doing on Richard Madden’s time in Western Australia.

In addition to my regular podcasts*, I enjoyed The Eleventh this month. It’s an Australian version of Slate’s Slow Burn series about Nixon and Watergate. The Eleventh that delves into the events leading up to the dramatic dismissal of the Whitlam government on 11 November 1975. Most Australians have heard Whitlam’s ‘Well may we say God save the Queen…’ quote. Despite knowing probably more than your average person about the events, I learnt a lot from the podcast, and it was fascinating hearing extended interviews with people involved at the time.

*My regulars include: Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Happier in Hollywood, the Daily and Satellite Sisters. I’m loving all of these at the moment… particularly the Satellite Sisters who are keeping me sane with lots of laughs 🙂

What I’ve been reading and listening to: February

I didn’t read much this month, but I did listen to more podcast series than usual.

Gaiutra Bahadur is an American journalist, born in Guyana. Coolie Woman: The Odyssey of Indenture revolves around the story of Bahadur’s great-grandmother (Sujaria) who travelled from India to Guyana in 1903 as an indentured labourer. Bahadur acknowledges that the book’s title may offend some, but she explains that the word (which originated from the Tamil word kuli, meaning wages or hire) is ‘true to her subject’. Sujaria left India as a high-caste Hindu, but being swept up in a mass movement of people, the power of her colonizers to name and misname her formed a key part of her story. According to Bahadur, the word coolie ‘carries the baggage of colonialism on its back.’

Bahadur’s research is exemplary, but the book suffers from her desire to include what seems like all of her findings, rather than to pick out a few examples. This makes the book a ‘dense’ read. I found myself skipping over sections, trying to pick out the memoir aspects (I was fascinated by the author’s own story of emigration from Guyana to New York), and Sujaria’s storyline. The reality is that Sujaria left little trace in her village in India, or even on the journey and in her new life in the Caribbean. So Bahadur does what any good historian would do, and researches around the life that Sujaria lived to permit some educated speculation. The result is a brilliant history of indenture-era Guyana and late nineteenth-century India, with a focus on women’s lives in both places. I was interested in the history of Guyana post-slavery, and was also fascinated in the more modern-day insights into relations between different elements of the Indian diaspora.

I read the latest John le Carré novel in a day. I love a good spy novel – this one is set in contemporary London, with forays into Eastern Europe. I highly recommend it.

I still haven’t read Kate Fullagar’s The Warrior, the Voyager, and the Artist in full yet, but I went to the launch this month, which was very exciting. I’m mentioned in the acknowledgments, and I feel as though I’ve read a lot of it, having seen Kate talk about the book at various points of its development. but I’m looking forward to putting it all together in March.

In addition to my regular podcasts*, I enjoyed these series:

  • The Catch and Kill Podcast – Great series which covers shocking material in relation to Ronan Farrow’s investigation into Harvey Weinstein, published in the New Yorker in 2017. The podcast is a great companion to She Said, the book written about a parallel investigation by two New York Times journalists.
  • A Podcast of One’s Own – Julia Gillard’s round-up of the first year of her podcast with the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at King’s College London… the interviews are always fascinating, I’m so pleased to hear it will continue through 2020.
  • WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork – shocking/hilarious/unbelievable – even if you know nothing about this outrageous story from the business world, this podcast is well worth a listen!
  • Broken: Jeffrey Epstein. Another shocking account of an utterly despicable person and the people around him. Like Catch and Kill and She Said, the podcast details the process of researching and breaking the news about Epstein. This is probably the strongest element of this particular podcast. Maybe I’m cynical, but I honestly didn’t find the extent to which people like Epstein are embedded in our society shocking in itself.

And to end on a high note – my favourite thing this month was watching Cheer on Netflix 🙂

*My regulars include: Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Happier in Hollywood, the Daily and Satellite Sisters.

What I’ve been reading and listening to: January

As I usually do in January, I read lots of articles about goal-setting, New Year’s Resolutions and productivity  – and have since completely forgotten all of it. I read a lot about climate change and sustainability, desperately wanting to do more to help my poor burning country and this world we share. Less Stuff was interesting but I didn’t learn anything new, and I must admit I only dipped into Grit – I’ll return to it though, I’m sure. It’s been a busy month with holiday time, work, getting ready for the new school year – oh, and I took part in an online book proposal writing course. I will submit a proposal based on my PhD research to a couple of publishers soon – so watch this space!

I read Ophelia at my (12.5 year old) daughter’s insistence. I enjoyed it and it’s reminded me that one day I’d like to write for this age group/market – middle school readers interested in history.

While I’m ambivalent about Peter FitzSimons’ style of writing, I was interested to read The Catalpa Rescue as it covers John Boyle O’Reilly’s story, which I wrote about during my undergrad degree.  I’m writing a short review of the book for the Rottnest Island Voluntary Guides newsletter, as some of the Catalpa drama took place off the coast of Rottnest, Western Australia. My Mum is a Guide and we both think this story would liven up one of the (already excellent!) free walking tours on the island.

I’m also writing a review of Mark Quintanilla’s An Irishman Life, which is an edited arrangement of the letter book of Michael Keane, the Irish-born Attorney-General of St Vincent in the 1780s. I’ve been waiting for the book for ages, as I drew extensively on Quintanilla’s scholarly articles about Keane and St Vincent in my PhD thesis.

In addition to reading during January, I enjoyed these podcasts:

  • Dolly Parton’s America – I binged this, such a fun and uplifting podcast.
  • History Watch– a few years old now, but there are some fascinating episodes for those interested in Caribbean history and the work of historians in the Caribbean.
  • AML Talk Show – (AML = Anti-money laundering) This interview series is hosted by a former colleague of mine from London. I particularly enjoyed the interview with Bill Browder, the author of Red Notice and driving force behind the Magnitsky Act.
  • Russia, If You’re Listening, series 3 from the ABC Australia. Fascinating and entertaining.

What I’ve been reading: December

I’ve resolved to share what I’m reading, in the hope that this will encourage me to read even more.

I discovered Elizabeth Strout in 2019. I so admire her ability to convey so much of her characters and of ordinary life in so few words. ‘Girl, Woman, Other’ reminded me of Zadie Smith in her rendering of London, the book felt like an extended visit to one of my home cities. I only skimmed O’Mara’s book – it wasn’t as interesting as I’d hoped.

In addition to reading during December, I binge-watched ‘Morning Wars’ (aka ‘The Morning Show’) and binge-listened to Tunnel 29, a fascinating podcast about an escape under the Berlin Wall.

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I’ve also signed up for the Australian Women Writers Challenge 2020. The AWW Challenge aims to help overcome gender bias in the reviewing of books written by Australian women. I’m aiming to complete the ‘Franklin’ level of the challenge – to read 10 books by Australian women this year, and review at least 6 of those here on this blog. To learn more about the Challenge, visit their homepage here.