Fierce Girls Podcast

Fierce Girls is a podcast aimed at primary school girls, produced by ABC Radio in Australia. Each episode narrates the story of an Australian girl or woman—some historical figures, some in the recent past—who has somehow pushed beyond boundaries and achieved more than was expected of her.

The episodes are narrated by well-known Australian women, and include sound effects and some voice actors playing the role of the protagonist. This is at times a bit grating to the adult ear, but the variety of voices seems to keep children interested and propels the narrative along.

The standout episodes for me have been the historical ones—about World War II spy Nancy Wake, pilot Nancy Bird-Walton and ground-breaking Olympic swimmers Fanny Durack and Mina Wylie. Episodes about more recent events include Jessica Watson’s solo sailing voyage around the world and Cathy Freeman’s (brilliant!) run at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. I’ve mentioned a number of sportswomen and girls here, but Series 1 also covered social activists, indigenous women and women in education and the arts.

I recommend the podcast for children and adults—and I would say it is certainly not just for girls. The themes and issues raised (subtly) are universal. Children can spot a ‘moral of the story’ a mile away. For the most part, this podcast manages to tell great stories in an engaging way, raise some questions, and provide good fodder for discussion afterwards. Australian boys deserve to know about the exploits of these fierce girls just as much as Australian girls do.* We’re all in this together!

Series 2 is currently in production.

*Also no reason why this podcast wouldn’t translate internationally.

 

The Irish Passport: A Podcast on Irish Culture, History and Politics

The Irish Passport, hosted by historian Tim McInerney and journalist Naomi O’Leary, is now into its second series. The aim of the podcast is to tie current events in Ireland to the history and culture that explain them. As a result, there is an underlying thread of politics to the series—think Brexit (primarily!) and more recently the referendum to repeal the 8th amendment of the Irish Constitution.

McInerney and O’Leary do a brilliant job, however, of unravelling the misconceptions which often swirl around Irish history and culture. In Series 1, the podcast investigated Britain’s ‘knowledge gap’ about Ireland, and in so doing provided a potted history of British/Irish relations going back hundreds of years. They also delved into the 1916 Easter Rising, the Great Hunger, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and the recently uncovered scandal at the Tuam Mother and Baby Home. Other episodes focused on cultural issues such as the Irish language and folklore.

A word of warning about The Irish Passport—the episodes are long! Most episodes are about an hour long, although recently McInerney and O’Leary have begun publishing shorter Halfpint episodes, available only to subscribers.

I highly recommend the podcast for anyone interested in understanding the deeply complicated history of the island of Ireland, and its relationship with Britain, Europe and the Atlantic world. As well as providing a solid grounding in Irish history and culture, the podcast will entertain you. The hosts may be rigorous in their research, but they are charming in their delivery.  After a while, I suspect most listeners don’t mind the hour+ running time!

 

Ben Franklin’s World, a podcast about early American history

Ben Franklin’s World is a weekly podcast hosted by Dr Liz Covart which focuses on the early American colonial period, broadly conceived. The topics covered over the 3+ years of the podcast are varied, and are only rarely connected with the subject of Benjamin Franklin himself.

Most episodes take the form of a detailed interview with an academic historian, usually centred around a book the historian has published. Covart’s skill as a podcaster is in keeping the conversation accessible to a generalist audience, but also in delving deep into the historical issues at play. The breadth of historical approaches (eg. social history, cultural history, history of ideas) covered by the podcast is impressive, exposing listeners to a variety of historical methodologies as well as some downright fascinating stories. There have been occasional interviews with public historians – one of which was the very first episode in which Covart went behind the stacks at the Library Company of Philadelphia, which was founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1731.

In conjunction with the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture Covart has released two Doing History series within the podcast. Season 1 (2016) was entitled How Historians Work and focused on how scholars frame historical problems; research in different kinds of archives; analyse primary materials including text, objects, and images; synthesize and critically engage secondary literature; present their work for collaborative feedback; and work with editors and publishers. Series 2 (2017), To The Revolution, built on Season 1’s discussions and demonstrated how differently scholars approach, understand, and portray the events comprising the American Revolution. I highly recommend the Doing History Series to undergraduate and postgraduate students, but also to those pursuing their own non-academic research and writing.

The show notes accompanying each episode summarise the interview and include links to the interviewee’s work and other resources discussed during the episode. The show notes also helpfully link to complementary episodes of Ben Franklin’s World, allowing listeners to delve into other discussions around the topic.

Ben Franklin’s World has won many awards. It currently stands as the reigning best history podcast and performs in the top 7 percent of all podcasts. A key to the show’s success  is its accessibility. The podcast can be enjoyed by those inside and outside of academia. Covart’s goal with Ben Franklin’s World has always been to make great scholarly history available to people outside the profession—she has certainly achieved that goal, and the show goes from strength to strength.

 

A month of history podcasts: May 2017

The past month for me has involved trying out a few new history-related podcasts, some better than others, some more Trump-focused than others. I salute the efforts by historians to attempt to integrate the current seismic shift in American diplomacy, policy & the presidency by drawing historical parallels (and contrasts) – but I must admit I’ve actively sought to escape current affairs of late.  I’ll list a couple of podcasts here which do seek to historicise the current US administration, as well as some others I’ve discovered this month.

Letters of Complaint. This is a series of short episodes, part live-action, part discussion, which explore the grievances of Sydney’s 19th century residents. The City of Sydney historian Dr Lisa Murray delves into the City’s archives to reveal the best, worst and most bizarre letters of complaint. Click here for the website for the podcast, but you can also download the series on iTunes and elsewhere.

Just Words. This Australian series was released a few months ago amidst the (repeated) debate about section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act. The podcast examines a number of the legal cases  which have been brought under the section. It seems the debate has now been put to rest (fingers crossed), but these episodes serve as a really interesting examination of the history of a piece of Australian legislation, and its impact on the litigants and the wider public. I highly recommend the podcast – in particular the first few episodes. Click here for the podcast on iTunes, although it’s available via all the usual apps as well.

The Outlander Podcast, Episode 199 is an interview with the cast and production team for 1745. I wrote about this film in a post on my Caribbean Histories blog. That post also has links to the work of a team of historians at the University of Glasgow investigating runaway slaves in Scotland. The podcast interview is well worth a listen. The story in the film is fascinating, and as the writers mention, there is so much research yet to be done. I think it’s brilliant that this invisible history is being brought to the big screen.

The Whiskey Rebellion. This is a podcast series hosted by Frank Cogliano and David Silkenat, both historians of America based at the University of Edinburgh. The episodes I’ve listened to do tend to draw upon the current American presidency, but then explore events and figures in the American past. Click here for the Whiskey Rebellion site.

The Lawfare Podcast. This is for when I do want to hear about the goings-on at the White House. The episodes tend to be long, but in-depth, and feature some senior and experienced people with seemingly considered viewpoints. The podcast series is hosted by Lawfare, a website devoted to American national security, law and policy. This isn’t a history podcast, but appeals to the ex-lawyer/regulator in me. Click here for the Lawfare podcast site

I have to say my favourite find this month was this short interview with Jill Lepore about the evolution of Wonder Woman and her connection to feminism. Lepore is a brilliant writer and historian (one of my favourites), and is the author of The Secret History of Wonder Woman. Lepore is probably the best historian I know at relating the excitement of the process of archival research and the moment of discovery. She’s a very entertaining speaker—this is the kind of escapism I’d been seeking all month!

 

How to subscribe to a podcast. Subscribing simply means that whenever a new episode of a podcast is released, it will appear on your podcast app of choice, on your phone, iPad, computer etc. Click here to go to a how-to article written by one of my favourite (non-history) podcasters, Gretchen Rubin. The article explains how to subscribe to Rubin’s Happier podcast, but the steps she describes can be followed for any podcast. The article explains how to subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud, using either your computer or your iPhone or android phone. I hope this helps!

 

A month of history podcasts: April 2017

This is the first of what I hope will be a regular post with links to history-related podcasts I’ve listened to over the past month.

Some podcast series are well-established and not hard to find—such as Ben Franklin’s World or Stuff You Missed in History Class  but in a more recent trend, academic conferences and seminars are often being recorded and released online as podcasts. But these can be harder to find.

As always, I thrive on feedback from readers and listeners. If any of the podcasts I link to have interested you, or inspired you, please tell me! Also, please share with me any history-related podcasts you have discovered so that I can add them to my list.

* Please see the end of this post for a how-to guide for subscribing to podcasts*

1. Professor David Armitage, “Civil Wars: A History in Ideas.” A paper given at a seminar entitled “Partition and Civil Wars in Ireland 2020-2023: Civil Wars and Their Legacy” at Queen’s University Belfast, 10 March 2017. Armitage introduced his new book (Civil Wars: A History in Ideas) and traced the history of the idea of civil war from Cicero to Syria.

2. Paul Revere’s Ride Through History. This is the latest instalment in the ‘Doing History’ Series on Ben Franklin’s World, which focuses on how historians work. This episode focuses on why it is that historians have focused on Paul Revere’s ride on 18 April 1775, and not on the many other significant rides he took? Why is it that Revere seems to ride quickly into history and then just as quickly out of it? A great feature of the series is the additional resources – related to each episode – which are available on the Omohundro Institute’s website.  Click here to access the episode.

3. ‘Cuba is already ours:’ annexationists, filibusterers, & the US struggle to buy Cuba, 1820-1898. Dr Carrie Gibson, author of Empire’s Crossroads, which I reviewed here, recently gave a paper at University College Londons Institute of the Americas on the US’s many attempts to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century.

4. Mike Duncan is back with a new Revolution! Since 2013, Duncan (an historian, author, and podcaster) has produced a number of podcast series, each focusing in depth on a different revolution in the past. In march, his sixth series launched – focusing on the July Revolution in France (1830). Duncan focuses on timelines, and often goes into great detail about people, places and the order of events—not as much analysis as the other podcasts listed above, but the podcasts make for great listening and are very popular.

Click here to see Revolutions podcast in iTunes and here for Duncan’s website, which includes some images, maps and further commentary. Also, I linked to a previous series on the Haitian Revolution on my CaribbeanHistories blog here.

5. Last but not least, some Australian content from the Dictionary of Sydney. Lisa Murray, the Historian of the City of Sydney discussed an exhibition at the Australian Museum which highlights the work of two of the most prominent natural history illustrators in 19th Century Australia, Harriet and Helena Scott. Click here to see the accompanying blogpost at the Dictionary of Sydney – once there, click the ‘Listen Now’ button. If you explore the blog, you’ll find links to other podcasts from the Dictionary team.

How to subscribe to a podcast.

Subscribing simply means that whenever a new episode of a podcast is released, it will appear on your podcast app of choice, on your phone, iPad, computer etc. Click here to go to a how-to article written by one of my favourite (non-history) podcasters, Gretchen Rubin. The article explains how to subscribe to Rubin’s Happier podcast, but the steps she describes can be followed for any podcast. The article explains how to subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud, using either your computer or your iPhone or android phone. I hope this helps!

‘Cuba is already ours’: annexationists, filibusterers, & the US struggle to buy Cuba, 1820-1898

Dr Carrie Gibson, author of Empire’s Crossroads, which I reviewed here, recently gave a paper at UCL in London on the US’s many attempts to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century.

The paper is packed with information about nineteenth-century Cuba, and the various parties vying for power and influence there. Dr Gibson sets the story in the wider context, explaining how European imperial powers,  and the US and Cuba interacted at that time. The paper is fascinating, I highly recommend it for anyone interested in Cuba, or interested in the US’s intentions in the region during its formative years as a nation.

The paper is available to download or listen to via soundcloud – click here to listen.

For further information about the events, videos & podcasts from UCL’s Institute of the Americas, click here.

 

 

Podcasting the history of the Caribbean in 100 objects

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Archaeologists Alice Samson and Angus Mol use a different object or artefact in each episode of  their podcast The History of the Caribbean in 100 Objects to tell the story of past and present cultures and societies of the Caribbean. What I particularly enjoy about the podcast is that they have selected artefacts from across the Caribbean, crossing language barriers to teach us about artefacts from the formerly Spanish, British and Dutch parts of the region, as well as the pre-Columbian era. This is no mean feat—historians are all too often limited by language barriers in studying the Caribbean, particularly those who are reliant upon documentary (written) evidence. As archaeologists, Samson and Mol have managed to cross some of those barriers. Episode 1 discusses a guaíza, which is a small sculpture of a face, dating back to between 1200-1300. Studying this artefact opens up research on the people who lived in today’s Dominican republic, before Columbus ‘discovered’ the region.

The episodes are of a manageable length—some as short as 15 minutes, but most about 25 minutes long. The hosts’ discussions provide all sorts of information, and give us a fascinating insight into the fieldwork and research undertaken by archaeologists across the Caribbean. The episodes range across topics as diverse as the discovery of a blue bead from Statia, a coin from St.Kitts, and three statutes from a house in the centre of Santo Domingo. There is also an associated website which has some stunning photography of the objects (and of the Caribbean itself).

This is a link to the podcast on iTunes: A History of the Caribbean in 100 Objects

and this is a link to the website, with show notes: Shores of Time Podcast Notes

Revolutionary Podcast

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An illustration from The Life of Toussaint L’Ouverture: the Negro Patriot of Hayti by J.R. Beard (London, 1853). From the New York Public Library. 

Mike Duncan is an historian, author, and podcaster. Since 2013 he has produced a number of podcast series, each focusing in depth on a different revolution in the past. Series 4 of Revolutions Podcast (which spanned 19 episodes) covered the Haitian revolution in all its confusing glory. Duncan takes the listener through the background in Saint Domingue pre-revolution, explains who was who, and traces the twists and turns of the revolution. The detail can get confusing at times, but this podcast is well worth investing time in. If, like me, you really want to understand how the history of Haiti unfolded,  then I highly recommend this series.

 

Click here to see Revolutions Podcast on iTunes, and here for Duncan’s website, which includes some images, maps and further commentary.

Duncan’s current series is equally fascinating—he’s covering Simón Bolívar and Gran Colombia.

 

 

 

The Historians: ABC702 Sydney

Just a quick follow-up to my post last week about James Valentine’s weekly radio slot in Sydney which he’s calling ‘The Historians’…. I was duly alerted by my non-historian friend that there was an historian on the radio this week again – it was Associate Prof Frank Bongiorno from ANU who had some insights into the Australian conscription debates during World War I. The segment is available for a few more days HERE, and starts at about 1:04:00.

Let’s find out if historians can talk!

As I’ve written here before, I’m an avid podcast-listener, and I’m a fan of Liz Covart’s format in Ben Franklin’s World. For those of you who haven’t listened, BFW is a weekly podcast in which the host (Liz) interviews an historian of early America about their research. The podcast has a loyal subscriber base, and is approaching its landmark 100th episode, which is a wonderful achievement as most podcasts don’t get into double figures.

I’m convinced that there is enough material in Australia to support a weekly conversation with an historian – I guess the question is whether there is the listener/subscriber base. This is something I’ve thought about pursuing after I get through my PhD. So  I was delighted to hear this week that James Valentine, a radio host with ABC702 in Sydney kicked off just such a conversation with Associate Professor Clare Wright from LaTrobe University. What was even better for me was that I heard about this not from anyone in the history fraternity, but from friends in my exercise class…so there’s a small listener base excited about this already! Valentine’s stated aim is to have a weekly conversation with an historian on his afternoon radio show to discuss their research and current debates in history. He wants to talk with historians of Australia and beyond. His pitch for the segment was that we hear from journalists, writers and social commentators on history—but not a lot from historians.* He’s keen to find out if historians can talk!

You can listen to Valentine & Wright’s conversation HERE. It goes from 1:28:00 until about 1:50:00. (Unfortunately this recording will disappear after a few days, but if I find it elsewhere I’ll update the link.) Dr Wright talked generally about what she loves about researching history—about the detective work involved and the adrenaline of the chase that keeps her going back to the archives. She then talked about her own current research, which is an expansion of the work she did on the Forgotten Rebels of Eureka. She’s now looking at mining history in Australia from pre-invasion to the (doomed) 2012 Mining Resources Rent Tax.

*In Australia, this may have something to do with the virulent nature of popular debate around what came to be known as the Australian history wars, but that’s another story.

By the way, Dr Wright co-convened a great symposium on history and the media in 2013 – to revisit some of the discussions there, link here to the symposium blog.