Tag Archives: Podcast

What I’ve been reading and listening to: March

Sunday 1 March feels like a year ago! That was the day my family explored a suburb of Sydney we’d never been to before (Haberfield) and vowed to explore more every couple of weeks… fast forward to 1 April and we’re staying home except for my local #walk20in20 and the occasional grocery shopping trip.

To reading though…I read a lot about the COVID19 pandemic for a couple of weeks, but am now limiting myself to one news fix per day.

My reading this month wasn’t that inspiring to be honest, but the trajectory is kind of interesting. I started with Lucy Treloar’s Wolfe Island, which is beautifully written, but got me down in a climate change/end of the world way. Little did I know a pandemic was just around the corner, to put my fear of the damage of climate change on the back burner!! Next was The War that Saved my Life which I read on my 12 year old’s recommendation. It was a nice change of pace from Treloar’s book (although the subject matter is quite sad). It was also illuminating to see what ‘the kids’ are reading about historical events these days.

I went to a bookshop to buy Dan Ziffer’s A Wunch of Bankers, couldn’t find it and picked up Too Big to Fail instead. I thought it’d be interesting to read about the last global financial fiasco, ten years down the track. I speed-read much of it (too much detail and breathless gossip) and now I can’t bring myself to finish it. I know how it ends, and now that we’re in the midst of another fiasco, I’ve lost interest!

A Different Kind of Subject is my nod to academic reading this month, which has been completely disrupted by all the upheaval of transiting to full-time work and school from home. Hunter’s book on colonial law in Aboriginal-European relations in 19th century Western Australia is really useful for the research I’m doing on Richard Madden’s time in Western Australia.

In addition to my regular podcasts*, I enjoyed The Eleventh this month. It’s an Australian version of Slate’s Slow Burn series about Nixon and Watergate. The Eleventh that delves into the events leading up to the dramatic dismissal of the Whitlam government on 11 November 1975. Most Australians have heard Whitlam’s ‘Well may we say God save the Queen…’ quote. Despite knowing probably more than your average person about the events, I learnt a lot from the podcast, and it was fascinating hearing extended interviews with people involved at the time.

*My regulars include: Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Happier in Hollywood, the Daily and Satellite Sisters. I’m loving all of these at the moment… particularly the Satellite Sisters who are keeping me sane with lots of laughs 🙂

What I’ve been reading and listening to: February

I didn’t read much this month, but I did listen to more podcast series than usual.

Gaiutra Bahadur is an American journalist, born in Guyana. Coolie Woman: The Odyssey of Indenture revolves around the story of Bahadur’s great-grandmother (Sujaria) who travelled from India to Guyana in 1903 as an indentured labourer. Bahadur acknowledges that the book’s title may offend some, but she explains that the word (which originated from the Tamil word kuli, meaning wages or hire) is ‘true to her subject’. Sujaria left India as a high-caste Hindu, but being swept up in a mass movement of people, the power of her colonizers to name and misname her formed a key part of her story. According to Bahadur, the word coolie ‘carries the baggage of colonialism on its back.’

Bahadur’s research is exemplary, but the book suffers from her desire to include what seems like all of her findings, rather than to pick out a few examples. This makes the book a ‘dense’ read. I found myself skipping over sections, trying to pick out the memoir aspects (I was fascinated by the author’s own story of emigration from Guyana to New York), and Sujaria’s storyline. The reality is that Sujaria left little trace in her village in India, or even on the journey and in her new life in the Caribbean. So Bahadur does what any good historian would do, and researches around the life that Sujaria lived to permit some educated speculation. The result is a brilliant history of indenture-era Guyana and late nineteenth-century India, with a focus on women’s lives in both places. I was interested in the history of Guyana post-slavery, and was also fascinated in the more modern-day insights into relations between different elements of the Indian diaspora.

I read the latest John le CarrĂ© novel in a day. I love a good spy novel – this one is set in contemporary London, with forays into Eastern Europe. I highly recommend it.

I still haven’t read Kate Fullagar’s The Warrior, the Voyager, and the Artist in full yet, but I went to the launch this month, which was very exciting. I’m mentioned in the acknowledgments, and I feel as though I’ve read a lot of it, having seen Kate talk about the book at various points of its development. but I’m looking forward to putting it all together in March.

In addition to my regular podcasts*, I enjoyed these series:

  • The Catch and Kill Podcast – Great series which covers shocking material in relation to Ronan Farrow’s investigation into Harvey Weinstein, published in the New Yorker in 2017. The podcast is a great companion to She Said, the book written about a parallel investigation by two New York Times journalists.
  • A Podcast of One’s Own – Julia Gillard’s round-up of the first year of her podcast with the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at King’s College London… the interviews are always fascinating, I’m so pleased to hear it will continue through 2020.
  • WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork – shocking/hilarious/unbelievable – even if you know nothing about this outrageous story from the business world, this podcast is well worth a listen!
  • Broken: Jeffrey Epstein. Another shocking account of an utterly despicable person and the people around him. Like Catch and Kill and She Said, the podcast details the process of researching and breaking the news about Epstein. This is probably the strongest element of this particular podcast. Maybe I’m cynical, but I honestly didn’t find the extent to which people like Epstein are embedded in our society shocking in itself.

And to end on a high note – my favourite thing this month was watching Cheer on Netflix 🙂

*My regulars include: Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Happier in Hollywood, the Daily and Satellite Sisters.

What I’ve been reading and listening to: January

As I usually do in January, I read lots of articles about goal-setting, New Year’s Resolutions and productivity  – and have since completely forgotten all of it. I read a lot about climate change and sustainability, desperately wanting to do more to help my poor burning country and this world we share. Less Stuff was interesting but I didn’t learn anything new, and I must admit I only dipped into Grit – I’ll return to it though, I’m sure. It’s been a busy month with holiday time, work, getting ready for the new school year – oh, and I took part in an online book proposal writing course. I will submit a proposal based on my PhD research to a couple of publishers soon – so watch this space!

I read Ophelia at my (12.5 year old) daughter’s insistence. I enjoyed it and it’s reminded me that one day I’d like to write for this age group/market – middle school readers interested in history.

While I’m ambivalent about Peter FitzSimons’ style of writing, I was interested to read The Catalpa Rescue as it covers John Boyle O’Reilly’s story, which I wrote about during my undergrad degree.  I’m writing a short review of the book for the Rottnest Island Voluntary Guides newsletter, as some of the Catalpa drama took place off the coast of Rottnest, Western Australia. My Mum is a Guide and we both think this story would liven up one of the (already excellent!) free walking tours on the island.

I’m also writing a review of Mark Quintanilla’s An Irishman Life, which is an edited arrangement of the letter book of Michael Keane, the Irish-born Attorney-General of St Vincent in the 1780s. I’ve been waiting for the book for ages, as I drew extensively on Quintanilla’s scholarly articles about Keane and St Vincent in my PhD thesis.

In addition to reading during January, I enjoyed these podcasts:

  • Dolly Parton’s America – I binged this, such a fun and uplifting podcast.
  • History Watch– a few years old now, but there are some fascinating episodes for those interested in Caribbean history and the work of historians in the Caribbean.
  • AML Talk Show – (AML = Anti-money laundering) This interview series is hosted by a former colleague of mine from London. I particularly enjoyed the interview with Bill Browder, the author of Red Notice and driving force behind the Magnitsky Act.
  • Russia, If You’re Listening, series 3 from the ABC Australia. Fascinating and entertaining.

What I’ve been reading: December

I’ve resolved to share what I’m reading, in the hope that this will encourage me to read even more.

I discovered Elizabeth Strout in 2019. I so admire her ability to convey so much of her characters and of ordinary life in so few words. ‘Girl, Woman, Other’ reminded me of Zadie Smith in her rendering of London, the book felt like an extended visit to one of my home cities. I only skimmed O’Mara’s book – it wasn’t as interesting as I’d hoped.

In addition to reading during December, I binge-watched ‘Morning Wars’ (aka ‘The Morning Show’) and binge-listened to Tunnel 29, a fascinating podcast about an escape under the Berlin Wall.

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I’ve also signed up for the Australian Women Writers Challenge 2020. The AWW Challenge aims to help overcome gender bias in the reviewing of books written by Australian women. I’m aiming to complete the ‘Franklin’ level of the challenge – to read 10 books by Australian women this year, and review at least 6 of those here on this blog. To learn more about the Challenge, visit their homepage here.

Fierce Girls Podcast

Fierce Girls is a podcast aimed at primary school girls, produced by ABC Radio in Australia. Each episode narrates the story of an Australian girl or woman—some historical figures, some in the recent past—who has somehow pushed beyond boundaries and achieved more than was expected of her.

The episodes are narrated by well-known Australian women, and include sound effects and some voice actors playing the role of the protagonist. This is at times a bit grating to the adult ear, but the variety of voices seems to keep children interested and propels the narrative along.

The standout episodes for me have been the historical ones—about World War II spy Nancy Wake, pilot Nancy Bird-Walton and ground-breaking Olympic swimmers Fanny Durack and Mina Wylie. Episodes about more recent events include Jessica Watson’s solo sailing voyage around the world and Cathy Freeman’s (brilliant!) run at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. I’ve mentioned a number of sportswomen and girls here, but Series 1 also covered social activists, indigenous women and women in education and the arts.

I recommend the podcast for children and adults—and I would say it is certainly not just for girls. The themes and issues raised (subtly) are universal. Children can spot a ‘moral of the story’ a mile away. For the most part, this podcast manages to tell great stories in an engaging way, raise some questions, and provide good fodder for discussion afterwards. Australian boys deserve to know about the exploits of these fierce girls just as much as Australian girls do.* We’re all in this together!

Series 2 is currently in production.

*Also no reason why this podcast wouldn’t translate internationally.

 

The Irish Passport: A Podcast on Irish Culture, History and Politics

The Irish Passport, hosted by historian Tim McInerney and journalist Naomi O’Leary, is now into its second series. The aim of the podcast is to tie current events in Ireland to the history and culture that explain them. As a result, there is an underlying thread of politics to the series—think Brexit (primarily!) and more recently the referendum to repeal the 8th amendment of the Irish Constitution.

McInerney and O’Leary do a brilliant job, however, of unravelling the misconceptions which often swirl around Irish history and culture. In Series 1, the podcast investigated Britain’s ‘knowledge gap’ about Ireland, and in so doing provided a potted history of British/Irish relations going back hundreds of years. They also delved into the 1916 Easter Rising, the Great Hunger, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and the recently uncovered scandal at the Tuam Mother and Baby Home. Other episodes focused on cultural issues such as the Irish language and folklore.

A word of warning about The Irish Passport—the episodes are long! Most episodes are about an hour long, although recently McInerney and O’Leary have begun publishing shorter Halfpint episodes, available only to subscribers.

I highly recommend the podcast for anyone interested in understanding the deeply complicated history of the island of Ireland, and its relationship with Britain, Europe and the Atlantic world. As well as providing a solid grounding in Irish history and culture, the podcast will entertain you. The hosts may be rigorous in their research, but they are charming in their delivery.  After a while, I suspect most listeners don’t mind the hour+ running time!

 

Ben Franklin’s World, a podcast about early American history

Ben Franklin’s World is a weekly podcast hosted by Dr Liz Covart which focuses on the early American colonial period, broadly conceived. The topics covered over the 3+ years of the podcast are varied, and are only rarely connected with the subject of Benjamin Franklin himself.

Most episodes take the form of a detailed interview with an academic historian, usually centred around a book the historian has published. Covart’s skill as a podcaster is in keeping the conversation accessible to a generalist audience, but also in delving deep into the historical issues at play. The breadth of historical approaches (eg. social history, cultural history, history of ideas) covered by the podcast is impressive, exposing listeners to a variety of historical methodologies as well as some downright fascinating stories. There have been occasional interviews with public historians – one of which was the very first episode in which Covart went behind the stacks at the Library Company of Philadelphia, which was founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1731.

In conjunction with the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture Covart has released two Doing History series within the podcast. Season 1 (2016) was entitled How Historians Work and focused on how scholars frame historical problems; research in different kinds of archives; analyse primary materials including text, objects, and images; synthesize and critically engage secondary literature; present their work for collaborative feedback; and work with editors and publishers. Series 2 (2017), To The Revolution, built on Season 1’s discussions and demonstrated how differently scholars approach, understand, and portray the events comprising the American Revolution. I highly recommend the Doing History Series to undergraduate and postgraduate students, but also to those pursuing their own non-academic research and writing.

The show notes accompanying each episode summarise the interview and include links to the interviewee’s work and other resources discussed during the episode. The show notes also helpfully link to complementary episodes of Ben Franklin’s World, allowing listeners to delve into other discussions around the topic.

Ben Franklin’s World has won many awards. It currently stands as the reigning best history podcast and performs in the top 7 percent of all podcasts. A key to the show’s success  is its accessibility. The podcast can be enjoyed by those inside and outside of academia. Covart’s goal with Ben Franklin’s World has always been to make great scholarly history available to people outside the profession—she has certainly achieved that goal, and the show goes from strength to strength.

 

A month of history podcasts: May 2017

The past month for me has involved trying out a few new history-related podcasts, some better than others, some more Trump-focused than others. I salute the efforts by historians to attempt to integrate the current seismic shift in American diplomacy, policy & the presidency by drawing historical parallels (and contrasts) – but I must admit I’ve actively sought to escape current affairs of late.  I’ll list a couple of podcasts here which do seek to historicise the current US administration, as well as some others I’ve discovered this month.

Letters of Complaint. This is a series of short episodes, part live-action, part discussion, which explore the grievances of Sydney’s 19th century residents. The City of Sydney historian Dr Lisa Murray delves into the City’s archives to reveal the best, worst and most bizarre letters of complaint. Click here for the website for the podcast, but you can also download the series on iTunes and elsewhere.

Just Words. This Australian series was released a few months ago amidst the (repeated) debate about section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act. The podcast examines a number of the legal cases  which have been brought under the section. It seems the debate has now been put to rest (fingers crossed), but these episodes serve as a really interesting examination of the history of a piece of Australian legislation, and its impact on the litigants and the wider public. I highly recommend the podcast – in particular the first few episodes. Click here for the podcast on iTunes, although it’s available via all the usual apps as well.

The Outlander Podcast, Episode 199 is an interview with the cast and production team for 1745. I wrote about this film in a post on my Caribbean Histories blog. That post also has links to the work of a team of historians at the University of Glasgow investigating runaway slaves in Scotland. The podcast interview is well worth a listen. The story in the film is fascinating, and as the writers mention, there is so much research yet to be done. I think it’s brilliant that this invisible history is being brought to the big screen.

The Whiskey Rebellion. This is a podcast series hosted by Frank Cogliano and David Silkenat, both historians of America based at the University of Edinburgh. The episodes I’ve listened to do tend to draw upon the current American presidency, but then explore events and figures in the American past. Click here for the Whiskey Rebellion site.

The Lawfare Podcast. This is for when I do want to hear about the goings-on at the White House. The episodes tend to be long, but in-depth, and feature some senior and experienced people with seemingly considered viewpoints. The podcast series is hosted by Lawfare, a website devoted to American national security, law and policy. This isn’t a history podcast, but appeals to the ex-lawyer/regulator in me. Click here for the Lawfare podcast site

I have to say my favourite find this month was this short interview with Jill Lepore about the evolution of Wonder Woman and her connection to feminism. Lepore is a brilliant writer and historian (one of my favourites), and is the author of The Secret History of Wonder Woman. Lepore is probably the best historian I know at relating the excitement of the process of archival research and the moment of discovery. She’s a very entertaining speaker—this is the kind of escapism I’d been seeking all month!

 

How to subscribe to a podcast. Subscribing simply means that whenever a new episode of a podcast is released, it will appear on your podcast app of choice, on your phone, iPad, computer etc. Click here to go to a how-to article written by one of my favourite (non-history) podcasters, Gretchen Rubin. The article explains how to subscribe to Rubin’s Happier podcast, but the steps she describes can be followed for any podcast. The article explains how to subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud, using either your computer or your iPhone or android phone. I hope this helps!

 

A month of history podcasts: April 2017

This is the first of what I hope will be a regular post with links to history-related podcasts I’ve listened to over the past month.

Some podcast series are well-established and not hard to find—such as Ben Franklin’s World or Stuff You Missed in History Class  but in a more recent trend, academic conferences and seminars are often being recorded and released online as podcasts. But these can be harder to find.

As always, I thrive on feedback from readers and listeners. If any of the podcasts I link to have interested you, or inspired you, please tell me! Also, please share with me any history-related podcasts you have discovered so that I can add them to my list.

* Please see the end of this post for a how-to guide for subscribing to podcasts*

1. Professor David Armitage, “Civil Wars: A History in Ideas.” A paper given at a seminar entitled “Partition and Civil Wars in Ireland 2020-2023: Civil Wars and Their Legacy” at Queen’s University Belfast, 10 March 2017. Armitage introduced his new book (Civil Wars: A History in Ideas) and traced the history of the idea of civil war from Cicero to Syria.

2. Paul Revere’s Ride Through History. This is the latest instalment in the ‘Doing History’ Series on Ben Franklin’s World, which focuses on how historians work. This episode focuses on why it is that historians have focused on Paul Revere’s ride on 18 April 1775, and not on the many other significant rides he took? Why is it that Revere seems to ride quickly into history and then just as quickly out of it? A great feature of the series is the additional resources – related to each episode – which are available on the Omohundro Institute’s website.  Click here to access the episode.

3. ‘Cuba is already ours:’ annexationists, filibusterers, & the US struggle to buy Cuba, 1820-1898. Dr Carrie Gibson, author of Empire’s Crossroads, which I reviewed here, recently gave a paper at University College Londons Institute of the Americas on the US’s many attempts to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century.

4. Mike Duncan is back with a new Revolution! Since 2013, Duncan (an historian, author, and podcaster) has produced a number of podcast series, each focusing in depth on a different revolution in the past. In march, his sixth series launched – focusing on the July Revolution in France (1830). Duncan focuses on timelines, and often goes into great detail about people, places and the order of events—not as much analysis as the other podcasts listed above, but the podcasts make for great listening and are very popular.

Click here to see Revolutions podcast in iTunes and here for Duncan’s website, which includes some images, maps and further commentary. Also, I linked to a previous series on the Haitian Revolution on my CaribbeanHistories blog here.

5. Last but not least, some Australian content from the Dictionary of Sydney. Lisa Murray, the Historian of the City of Sydney discussed an exhibition at the Australian Museum which highlights the work of two of the most prominent natural history illustrators in 19th Century Australia, Harriet and Helena Scott. Click here to see the accompanying blogpost at the Dictionary of Sydney – once there, click the ‘Listen Now’ button. If you explore the blog, you’ll find links to other podcasts from the Dictionary team.

How to subscribe to a podcast.

Subscribing simply means that whenever a new episode of a podcast is released, it will appear on your podcast app of choice, on your phone, iPad, computer etc. Click here to go to a how-to article written by one of my favourite (non-history) podcasters, Gretchen Rubin. The article explains how to subscribe to Rubin’s Happier podcast, but the steps she describes can be followed for any podcast. The article explains how to subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud, using either your computer or your iPhone or android phone. I hope this helps!

‘Cuba is already ours’: annexationists, filibusterers, & the US struggle to buy Cuba, 1820-1898

Dr Carrie Gibson, author of Empire’s Crossroads, which I reviewed here, recently gave a paper at UCL in London on the US’s many attempts to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century.

The paper is packed with information about nineteenth-century Cuba, and the various parties vying for power and influence there. Dr Gibson sets the story in the wider context, explaining how European imperial powers,  and the US and Cuba interacted at that time. The paper is fascinating, I highly recommend it for anyone interested in Cuba, or interested in the US’s intentions in the region during its formative years as a nation.

The paper is available to download or listen to via soundcloud – click here to listen.

For further information about the events, videos & podcasts from UCL’s Institute of the Americas, click here.