Category Archives: Exhibitions

Sally the Midwife: Enslaved Medical Practitioners and Historical Erasure

University of Glasgow Library Blog

Guest blog post by Linsey McMillan, PhD Student in History, University of Edinburgh.

This article was written by PhD student Linsey McMillan in conjunction with the current exhibition Call and Response: The University of Glasgow and Slavery. The exhibition seeks to explore the unknown or unexpected ways collections can be related to racial slavery, and continues the conversation by widening the range of responses to these historic legacies. McMillan’s research uniquely considers the role of undocumented histories and the impact that has on our understanding of the transatlantic slave trade today.

At first glance, this 1829 appraisal of the Invera Estate in Tobago appears to be nothing more than a cold, cursory account of the value attributed to the estate’s enslaved labourers, stock, and buildings. Alone it provides little to no evidence of the lives of the enslaved men, women, and children included in it.

But it is a…

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A Paris art gallery renames paintings to focus on their black subjects

The Musée d’Orsay in Paris has just opened an exhibition entitled ‘Le modèle noir De Géricault à Matisse,’ which attempts to restore the identities and perspectives of black figures depicted on canvas but largely written out of history. This article from the Washington Post focuses on one artwork in the exhibition. The painting by Marie-Guillemine Benoist has hung in the Louvre for decades under the title ‘Portrait of a black woman.’ In the new exhibition, the subject of the painting is named – it is entitled ‘Portrait of Madeleine’ because it is a portrait of an emancipated, formerly enslaved woman from Guadeloupe who worked in the home of the artist’s brother-in-law.  The exhibition addresses France’s role in the slave trade and the manifestation of the debate over slavery in the arts of the period.

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Marie-Guillemine Benoist, ‘Portrait d’une femme noire’ (1800), © Musée du Louvre

For more – click here for the Washington post article  and here for the exhibition website.

 

 

The Irish in Latin America: An exhibition

In February this year, Irish President Michael D. Higgins opened an exhibition in Havana, Cuba celebrating the role of Irish immigrants in Latin America and highlighting shared aspects of  Ireland and Latin America’s histories. The exhibition is curated by historian Margaret Brehony. Follow this link to the website for the Society for Irish Latin American Studies. The page includes the exhibition guide, and a further link to President Higgins’ speech in Havana.

The Irish in Latin America Exhibition

 

Review of the British Museum’s ‘A Revolutionary Legacy: Haiti and Toussaint Louverture’

For those lucky enough to be in London, the British Museum’s exhibition on Haiti and Toussaint is on for a couple more weeks. But before you make the trip to the Museum, you might want to read this exhibition review by Tabitha McIntosh, a research student who works on revolutionary Haiti. McIntosh is unimpressed by the Museum’s efforts in this exhibition, but argues that the “jumble of objects…demonstrates for visitors rather more than the Museum intended: that most of the material history of revolutionary Haiti is scattered around the globe and buried in the archives, institutions, and private collections of the Atlantic powers that vied—and vie—for dominance of the Caribbean.” The review is definitely worth a read!

 

 

 

Black History Month UK: Links

As Black History Month kicked off in the UK this week, my twitter feed has featured some fascinating research and writing about Britain’s black history. I’ll update this page as the month progresses with links to articles, historians, writers etc which contribute to getting Britain’s black history out in the public domain.

 

Melissa Bennett, UK-based historian of the Caribbean and photography – check out her Instagram blog

English Heritage has uncovered the identities of 2,500 Afro-Caribbean prisoners of war kept at Portchester Castle in England. This website tells the story of the prisoners’ transportation and life at Portchester.

Fay Young’s article on Sceptical Scot about Black History Month in Scotland

Black History Month in the UK

100 Great Black Britons relaunches for 2017

 

Black History Month in the UK

Black History Month in the United Kingdom runs during October. The ‘official’ website for the Month has information about the thousands of events planned across the UK. The ‘features’ tab of the website has many articles about aspects of black history, and opinion pieces. Click here for the Black History Month site.

I also noticed that David Olusoga’s book Black and British: A Forgotten History is available in ebook format for only 99p for the month (I believe only for UK customers): click here for details.