CFP: ‘Co-dependent Empires’: 2nd Annual Conference of Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy — Imperial Entanglements

13-14 July 2018, Museo Histórico de Acapulco ‘Fuerte de San Diego’, Acapulco, Mexico Conference Theme: The historiography on empires and imperial rivalries is abundant. The stories of the rise and fall of Rome, Carthage, Persia, Byzantium, Portugal, Spain, France, Britain, etc., are all well worn territory for a variety of historians. Empires have been compared […]

via CFP: ‘Co-dependent Empires’: 2nd Annual Conference of Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy — Imperial Entanglements

Ending Indenture in the British Empire: the ‘quiet abolition’

It’s a century since indenture, the system which immediately replaced slavery in parts of the former British Empire, was ended. Dr Maria del Pilar Kaladeen has been working on a number of events to commemorate the centenary of the abolition of indenture in the British Empire—as she has termed it ‘the quiet abolition.’ Quiet because it’s been a challenge to engage the public with this commemoration, as the history of indenture has been so little known.

See Dr del Pilar Kaladeen’s blogpost here – there are links from there to her research and to an exhibition she curated in London, as well as to a conference to be held next week at Senate House in London.

 

Symposium—Collaborating across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean

Repeating Islands

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The symposium “Collaborating across the Divide: Digital Humanities and the Caribbean” will take place September 21-22, 2017, at the University of Florida (in Gainesville, Florida). We’re hoping that folks involved in Caribbean Studies from around the region might be able to attend, with this event both focusing on and being an opportunity for facilitating collaborations. All events are free and open to the public and will take place in the Smathers Library, room 100.

Description: Digital technology has made the early twenty-first century a critical moment of opportunity by providing access to a wide range of library and archival materials and by offering new means of teaching, analyzing content, and presenting literary scholarship. While digital technologies have the promise of bridging institutional and geographic barriers, they have also continued to reproduce colonial hierarchies and marginalize content from the Caribbean and the Global South. This symposium, “Collaborating Across the Divide: Digital…

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Conference Roundup: ‘Rethinking Caribbean Emancipations’

On Friday, April 21, 2017, several dozen scholars met at Duke University’s Franklin Humanities Institute for a one-day conference entitled, “In Freedom’s Name: Rethinking Caribbean Emancipations.” Organized by two Duke history graduate students, Michael Becker and Kristina Williams, with their faculty advisor, Barry Gaspar, the conference hosted three panels featuring ten preeminent scholars of the Caribbean. Collectively, these scholars helped to trouble standard narratives about Caribbean emancipations and encourage audience members to consider new avenues for further research.

For Jonathan Dusenbury’s excellent summary of the panel discussions – follow this link.

 

 

Association of Caribbean Historians Annual Meeting

This is a link to the programme for the annual meeting of the Association of Caribbean Historians, which is happening in Tobago this week. Sadly I’m not in Tobago, so this is the closest I get to the ACH, but the programme gives an indication of the broad scope of historical work being done on the Caribbean, by historians from around the world. Follow up the names or institutions of speakers and topics you are interested in to discover more about the research being done.

For the sake of completion – I’ve included a picture of Tobago…

Conference: Memory, Migration & Decolonisation in the Caribbean & Beyond, 1804 to the present

Registration is now open for this conference, to be held at Senate House, London, on 23 and 24 May this year.

The programme is varied, and encompasses academic presentations, ’roundtable’ discussions, and practical workshop sessions. For example, there’s a workshop entitled ‘Creating Memoirs and Recording Experience’ which will focus on how to produce podcasts and write memoirs.

 

The conference looks fascinating, but for those of us who can’t attend, it’s still worth taking a look at the programme. If a paper title sparks your interest, take a look at the presenter’s work online—that’s a great way to find out who is researching a particular issue, question or region.

As always, if any blog readers do attend the conference, let me know. It would be great to post a follow-up to the conference, or an individual paper or workshop.

This is a link to the conference web page and I’ve copied the programme below.

 

Day One

10.15-12.15     Title TBC: Roundtable discussion between Caribbean migrants to Britain. Chaired by Roderck Westmaas (Guyana Speaks).

13.00-14.30     Panel One: ‘Reconciling the Past: Memory and Testimony in the Caribbean and Beyond’.

Denise Noble (Birmingham City University), ‘The Decolonial Poetics of Memory and Re-Memorying’.

Kelly Delancy (National Museum of the Bahamas), ‘History to Heritage: A Heritage Assessment of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, The Bahamas’.

Joan Andzeuh Nche, (Goldsmiths, University of London), ‘Questioning Relation and the Poetics of Home in Derek Walcott’s The Arkansas Testament’.

14.30-15.30     Workshop One: Creating Memoirs and Recording Experience: This session on how to produce podcasts and write memoirs.

15.45-17.15     Panel Two: ‘The Transnational Caribbean: Sites of (Neo)Colonial Contact’.

Clara Rachel Eybalin Casséus (IMLR, University of London), ‘Debt and the Haitian Quake: Mapping Mobility Through the Memory of the French Port of La Rochelle’.

Simeon Simeonov (Brown University), ‘The Consular Caribbean in the Age of Revolution: The Role of US and British Consulates in the Spanish American Revolutions’.

Nadine Chambers (Independent Researcher), ‘Decolonial, Post-Colonial or Neo-Colonial? The Rocky, Hard Places Between First Peoples and Arrivants in the Caribbean and Beyond’.

17.15-18.15     Keynote: Matthew Smith (University of the West Indies, Mona), ‘Loving and Leaving the New Jamaica: Reckoning with the 1960s’.

Day Two

 

10.00-11.30     Panel Three: ‘The Language of (De)Colonisation: Literature and Education’.

James Williams (Queen Mary University), ‘“More baká than border”: Shibboleths in Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao’.

Marie Lily Cerat (The Graduate Center, City University of New York), ‘Decolonizing and (Re)Theorizing the Haitian Experience: Vision of a Haitian natifnatal Epistemology’.

Ruth Minott Egglestone (Independent Researcher), ‘Finding the Anancyesque in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar and the Decolonisation Project in Jamaica Between 1938 and 1958’.

11.45-12.45     Workshop Two: Organising for the Caribbean: session on how to campaign for change in the Caribbean.

13.30-15.00     Panel Four: ‘Arguing Around Decolonisation: De-colonial Futures’.

Karen Salt (University of Nottingham), ‘Decolonisation, States of Blackness and the Problem of Black Nullification’.

Laura Lomas (Rutgers University), ‘Lourdes Casal’s Decolonial Writing in Havana and New York’.

Miguel Gualdrón (DePaul University), ‘Memories of the Abyss: Glissant’s Philosophy of Caribbean History in the Context of Césaire and Fanon’.

15.15-16.15     Panel Five: ‘Shifting Perceptions of the Caribbean: Reconfiguring Family and Nation’.

Adom Philogene Heron (ILAS, University of London), ‘The Name of the Father in the Caribbean: Myth, Metaphor, Multiplicity’.

Maria A. Lee Strohmayer (Independent Researcher), ‘Curating the Nation: The Politics of Recognition in a Bahamian National Museum’.

16.15-16.45     Performance by Rubén Dávila, ‘El Vuelo del Golondrino’ on the experience of Caribbean and Andean migrants to New York.

16.45-17.45     Guest Speakers: Tina K. Ramnarine (Royal Holloway, University of London); William ‘Lez’ Henry (University of West London).

Call for Papers – #Caribbean In/Securities and Creativity: #Diasporic Dialogues

Another conference! This one in London, 25-26 June.

Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC)

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Caribbean In/Securities and Creativity: Diasporic Dialogues

Sunday 25 and Monday 26 June, 2017

Venue: The Knowledge Centre, British Library, London

 

REVISED DEADLINE : May 5, 2017

Following our diaspora-focused conference in 2016, this year’s two-day event will include a conference and an art and research exhibition speaking to the theme of Caribbean and diasporic dialogues where the role of creativity is highlighted in negotiating the in/securities permeating such dialogues. The event is a result of collaboration between the Centre for Caribbean and Diaspora Studies (CCDS) at Goldsmiths, University of London, and Caribbean In/Securities: Creativity and Negotiation in the Caribbean (CARISCC), an international research network funded by the Leverhulme Trust and seeking to explore interactions between the precariousness of insecure livelihoods and neighbourhoods, and the negotiation of risk through creativity, in a Caribbean context. CARISCC deploys the term ‘in/securities’ to foreground the interplay between security and insecurity as negotiated and…

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Armed People of African Descent: Africa and the Americas, 1750-1900

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‘The Capture of Tubabakalong, Gambia, 1866, oil painting by Chevalier Louis William Desanges (1866), Penlee House Gallery & Museum, Penzance.

Warwick University’s history department is hosting this conference 12-13 May this year—it’s related to a four-year research project entitled ‘Africa’s Sons Under Arms: Race, Military Bodies and the British West India Regiments in the Atlantic World, 1795-1914.’ The draft programme is available on the conference website… so if any blog-readers are interested in this topic, scan the programme and follow up the work of the historians. If I was in the UK, I’d be doing my best to get to this conference. Please let me know if you are fortunate enough to attend!

As Warwick’s website explains, the conference is concerned with the use of armed men of African descent by the European empires and American states of the Atlantic world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This encompasses both those deliberately armed and those who had taken up arms, perhaps to liberate themselves, and later came to an accommodation with the regime, as well as short-term enrolments and permanent military establishments. The broader ‘Africa’s Sons Under Arms’ project focuses on military units raised by the British, initially as enslaved people, that served in the Caribbean and West Africa. A primary aim of the conference is to contextualise the Regiments in relation to similar formations and policies elsewhere. In so doing, the conference organisers hope that papers will build on and go beyond work on armed slaves, notably Brown and Morgan, Arming Slaves (2008), to think more broadly about the significance and impact of deploying armed men of African descent in a period when most were imperial subjects and generally denigrated within Euro-American discourse.

Click here to go to the Conference Website