Slavery and Britain’s infrastructure — Legacies of British Slave-ownership

by Nick Draper On Wednesday 8th May, I gave a presentation on ‘Slavery and Britain’s Infrastructure’ to staff at the National Infrastructure Commission’s secretariat in Holborn. The NIC was established in 2017 as an executive agency of HM Treasury with a charter to provide advice and make independent recommendations to government on national infrastructure priorities, […]

via Slavery and Britain’s infrastructure — Legacies of British Slave-ownership

Manumission in Eighteenth Century Jamaica

Quantitative History

David Beck Ryden, “Manumission in Late Eighteenth-Century Jamaica,” New West Indian Guide / Nieuwe West-Indische Gids 92:3-4  (2018): 211–244.

I’m very pleased that my most recent research on manumission in late-eighteenth century Jamaica has been published in the New West Indian Guide, the oldest scholarly journal with a focus on the Caribbean.

Manumission (the liberation of individual slaves) took place in many slave societies throughout history for a variety of reasons.  In this article, I use over 300 manumission deeds from Jamaica to explore the rationale for freedom grants, demography of the manumitted population, characteristics of the manumitters, and prices paid for freedom, when cash was exchanged.  In Jamaica, the proportion of slaves who were manumitted was very small, but one has to keep in mind that the entire population of bondsmen and women was very large on the island.  Nonetheless, manumission occurred on a regular basis and had…

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Q&A with Randy M. Browne, author of ‘Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean’ —from The Junto Blog

Randy M. Browne is a historian of slavery and colonialism in the Atlantic world, especially the Caribbean. He is an Associate Professor of History at Xaverian University (Cincinnati). Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean is his first book and he discusses it here with Jessica Parr.

via Q&A with Randy M. Browne, author of Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean — The Junto

‘Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833’ by Daniel Livesay – Q&A and a book review

Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833

Click here to visit the Junto website and read the Q&A

The book has also been reviewed in detail at the Institute of Historical Research ‘Reviews in History’ site: Click here for the review

Monumental Louverture: French/Haitian Sites of Memory and the Commemoration of Abolition

Another great Caribbean-focused post on the Age of Revolutions Blog.

Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Race and Revolution” series.

By Nathan H. Dize

In May 2017, France celebrated its eleventh day commemorating the Abolition of Slavery. Throughout the Republic, mayors gave speeches and placed wreaths of flowers   before statues and plaques in homage of key figures in the history of abolition.[1] In many cities, this meant honoring Toussaint Louverture, the leader who led his compatriots in the Haitian Revolution until he was arrested, deported, and imprisoned in France from August 1802 until his death in April 1803.  However, the French Republic has done little to recognize the circumstances that led to Louverture’s death on French soil as part of these commemorative celebrations.

Monuments to Louverture often only include mention of the oft-cited “tree of liberty,” his abolitionism, or that he “died in France.” Statues and plaques of Toussaint Louverture in Bordeaux, Grenoble, and in the Château…

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More Free Classics Now Available in Open Books Series

The Florida Bookshelf

Library-Press_blue

The LibraryPress@UF, an imprint of the University of Florida Press and the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, launched the Florida and the Caribbean Open Books Series this past November. This series makes available for free 39 classic out of print books on the region under an Open Access model. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of the Humanities Open Book Program.

The final 18 titles in the series are now available:

Afro-Cuban Religious Experience: Cultural Reflections in Narrative
Eugenio Matibag

The African American Heritage of Florida
Edited by David R. Colburn and Jane L. Landers

Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida
Jerald T. Milanich

The Architecture of Leisure: The Florida Resort Hotels of Henry Flagler and Henry Plant
Susan R. Braden

The Dutch in the Caribbean and on the Wild Coast, 1580–1680
Cornelis Ch. Goslinga

Eighteenth-Century Florida…

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Research Trajectory #5: The Natural History Collections of Bermuda

empire trees climate

Using Natural History Specimens in Interdisciplinary Research on Past Ecologies

Kirsten Greer

I am the Canada Research Chair in Global Environmental Histories and Geographies and am interested in how we can use historical natural history specimens (e.g. birds, plants, rocks) as cultural artifacts to examine global environmental change from an interdisciplinary perspective. Over the last decade, there has been a growing body of work recognizing the value of historical natural history specimens as valuable sources of data in global environmental change. Many of these specimens date back to over 150 years ago, and provide insight into environmental change over time when examined with contemporary records.

However, as critical scholars have emphasized, such historical natural history materials reflect not just simple representations of reality but were entangled in systems of knowledge and power in varying places and times. For example, a number of natural history collections in British museums connect to…

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For Sale: Cuba’s Revolutionary Figured World — Age of Revolutions

By María A. Cabrera Arús Over more than five decades, Cubans have become familiar with a revolutionary iconography constructed, in part, around a sartorial style characterized by olive-drab fatigue uniforms, black military boots, and long, disheveled beards. I have argued elsewhere that this sartorial identity played a determinant role in the construction of an olive-green […]

via For Sale: Cuba’s Revolutionary Figured World — Age of Revolutions

Haiti Links

Haiti has been in the international news this past week, not due to anything of its own making. In the aftermath, historians of Haiti have been very active, taking advantage of the spotlight to get Haiti’s story out there, in all its complexity. I’ve compiled a list of links to some responses to President Trump’s alleged slur, as well as some digital databases which will enable research on Haiti and its past. Please feel free to contact me with any additional links or content.

Haiti: A Reading List, from the University Press of Florida. And as a bonus, these books are all 30% off until 31 January, 2018 in the Press’ New Year Sale.

Read the introduction to Laurent Dubois’ 2012 book Haiti The Aftershocks of History.

50 Haitian Children’s Books about Haiti and Haitian Culture.

Duke University’s Radio Haiti Archive – audio from Radio Haiti-Inter, documenting Haitian politics, society & culture, 1957-2003

New York Times column, 12 January 2018: Haiti’s Resilience as Seen Through Literature

Washington Post column, 12 January 2018: This is how ignorant you have to be to call Haiti a shithole

A list of responses to President Trump’s comments on Haiti, published on HNet (Humanities and Social Sciences Online) 13 January, 2018, compiled by Dr Marlene Daut, with links. See also the H-Haiti Blog.

‘Currents in Conversation: Race, Racism and Immigration’ – a panel discussion at the Carter G. Woodson Institute, university of Virginia, 22 January 2018. The discussion will be recorded and later available to listen via the Institute’s website. I’ll update this post once there is a link to the discussion, but details of the event are available here.

If you click on the tag Haiti below, you’ll see all the other posts I’ve published about Haiti – many contain details of digital resources for researching Haiti’s past.

And because I’ve spent much of this week revising a thesis chapter which touches on the Haitian Revolution and War of Independence, I must point out the excellent chronology of Haitian history (from 1492 to 1817) in Youngquist & Pierrot’s edition of Marcus Rainsford’s An Historical Account of the Black Empire of Hayti (1805). The chronology appears on pages xi-xv.