Caribbean Histories: A New Blog!

Screen Shot 2017-02-09 at 2.43.20 pm.pngOver the summer, I ‘launched’ a new blog: Caribbean Histories. That sounds rather formal, but I wanted somewhere to share all the links and book notes I’ve kept over the past couple of years related to Caribbean history. I’ve discovered to my surprise that Caribbean history is somewhat under-appreciated. It’s dispersed between accounts from various perspectives and languages—including the European empires which had a hold on the region for so long, pre-Columbian perspectives, and more recently the African diaspora. And then there is the diversity within the region itself.  For my thesis I’m approaching it from a British/Irish perspective, which I know is only one of the myriad ways the history of the region can be approached. I hope that by sharing my finds, I can help those interested in Caribbean history to dig deeper. The blog is not pitched necessarily at the academic, rather I hope to spark interest in a more general reader. For example, high school or university students seeking deeper knowledge or help with a research topic, or travellers heading to the region for a holiday. If you know someone this could help out—please share!

Head on over to Caribbean Histories… and as always, I’d be very appreciative of feedback.

One of my favourite blogs of 2016 – the Australian Women’s History Network

VIDA blog Managing Editors Ana Stevenson and Alana Piper reflect on the year and share VIDA’s Top 10 posts for 2016. 2016 in review As we come to the end of the year, we at VIDA wanted to reflect on the … Continue reading → The post Top 10 for 2016 appeared first on Australian Women’s…

via Top 10 for 2016 — Australian Women’s History Network

Blogging around the web

While I’m not the most prolific blogger myself, I do love reading others’  blogs. I’m constantly discovering new blogs to follow, many (but not all) written by historians. If they are published in WordPress, they’re easy to keep track of in my Reader app, so I tend not to miss a post, but if they’re not WordPress…then I lose track of them. So as an aide memoire to myself, and as a way of promoting others’ blogs, I’m going to *try to* update this post regularly with blogs I’ve discovered.

 

Pubs and Publications. The PhD Experience

Isles Abroad. A Group Blog of British and Irish Global History

Gretchen Rubin – My experiments in the pursuit of happiness and good habits

 

Age of Revolutions – a collaborative, academic ‘historioblog’

Old Weather Blog: Our weather’s past, the climate’s future

National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

The Old Parramatta Blog

Amber Davis – Political Scientist & PhD Coach

 

My favourite history blogs

As a novice PhD student, I spend an inordinate amount of time reading, but end most days frustrated that I haven’t read more. I have trouble settling down with fiction, which was one of my favourite pastimes pre-study. Instead, my spare reading time these days is taken up with reading blogposts—there are so, so many fantastic blogs out there written by academic historians, public historians, genealogists and other students of history. The WordPress Reader is one of the most-used apps on my phone (after twitter of course!) But the problem with an over-reliance on WordPress is that I have to remind myself to seek out blogs published on other platforms.  According to an astute observer* of digital media, it’s so easy to create and publish content in the digital age, but much harder to get noticed. I’ve recently discovered History Carnival, which does a great job of drawing history blogs out into the light. History Carnival is a monthly showcase of blog writing about history, hosted by a different blog each month to provide a variety of approaches and perspectives. In a similar vein, the University of Exeter’s Imperial and Global Forum’s weekly Top Picks in Imperial & Global History and the Junto’s The Week in Early American History provide links to blogposts, as well as writing from more traditional outlets.  The Two Nerdy History Girls also regularly post collections of links to their favourite blogposts, entitled the Breakfast Links. If any readers know of any other such aggregators, please do let me know.  These collections of links do other bloggers a great service by further sharing bloggers’ work.

Courtesy of Joanne Bailey’s excellent history blog, I’ve discovered a great app called Bundlr which has allowed me to take control of my messy collection of internet bookmarks. Click here to view the bundle I’ve created for my favourite history websites. (I was going to break the bundle down into categories of history blogs, but I think that’s called procrastination as I really should get on with my work!) I hope Bundlr is here to stay…it’s an intuitive platform, and very simple to use. I hope you find some new favourite sites and writers among mine. Let me know what you think!

*my husband

Update: Bundlr contacted me today (13 May) to say that my History Bloggers Bundle is featured on their Explore homepage today. I have no idea of the exposure that page has, really, but if it garners some new readers for any of the fabulous blogs I’ve bundled, I’m happy!