Author Archives: McLarenJen

About McLarenJen

I completed my PhD thesis, 'Irish Lives in the British Caribbean,' in 2018 at Macquarie University. I researched the lives of ten Irish settlers and sojourners in the Caribbean during the Revolutionary era to examine the Irish experience of empire—uncovering stories of slave traders, abolitionists, missionaries, planters and soldiers. My findings spanned Irish history, British imperial history and the history of the Caribbean and i'm still working out the best way to share my research. My Masters thesis also examined an aspect of eigtheenth-century Irish history—the reception in England and Ireland of news of an imperial naval victory—and was published in a special edition on Transnational Ireland in the Irish studies journal Éire-Ireland. I maintains two blogs dedicated to my passion for history, one a personal site https://modhistorymusings.com and the other shares research and resources which illuminate the history of the Caribbean: https://caribbeanhistories.com

The Irish Passport: A Podcast on Irish Culture, History and Politics

The Irish Passport, hosted by historian Tim McInerney and journalist Naomi O’Leary, is now into its second series. The aim of the podcast is to tie current events in Ireland to the history and culture that explain them. As a result, there is an underlying thread of politics to the series—think Brexit (primarily!) and more recently the referendum to repeal the 8th amendment of the Irish Constitution.

McInerney and O’Leary do a brilliant job, however, of unravelling the misconceptions which often swirl around Irish history and culture. In Series 1, the podcast investigated Britain’s ‘knowledge gap’ about Ireland, and in so doing provided a potted history of British/Irish relations going back hundreds of years. They also delved into the 1916 Easter Rising, the Great Hunger, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, and the recently uncovered scandal at the Tuam Mother and Baby Home. Other episodes focused on cultural issues such as the Irish language and folklore.

A word of warning about The Irish Passport—the episodes are long! Most episodes are about an hour long, although recently McInerney and O’Leary have begun publishing shorter Halfpint episodes, available only to subscribers.

I highly recommend the podcast for anyone interested in understanding the deeply complicated history of the island of Ireland, and its relationship with Britain, Europe and the Atlantic world. As well as providing a solid grounding in Irish history and culture, the podcast will entertain you. The hosts may be rigorous in their research, but they are charming in their delivery.  After a while, I suspect most listeners don’t mind the hour+ running time!

 

Ben Franklin’s World, a podcast about early American history

Ben Franklin’s World is a weekly podcast hosted by Dr Liz Covart which focuses on the early American colonial period, broadly conceived. The topics covered over the 3+ years of the podcast are varied, and are only rarely connected with the subject of Benjamin Franklin himself.

Most episodes take the form of a detailed interview with an academic historian, usually centred around a book the historian has published. Covart’s skill as a podcaster is in keeping the conversation accessible to a generalist audience, but also in delving deep into the historical issues at play. The breadth of historical approaches (eg. social history, cultural history, history of ideas) covered by the podcast is impressive, exposing listeners to a variety of historical methodologies as well as some downright fascinating stories. There have been occasional interviews with public historians – one of which was the very first episode in which Covart went behind the stacks at the Library Company of Philadelphia, which was founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1731.

In conjunction with the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture Covart has released two Doing History series within the podcast. Season 1 (2016) was entitled How Historians Work and focused on how scholars frame historical problems; research in different kinds of archives; analyse primary materials including text, objects, and images; synthesize and critically engage secondary literature; present their work for collaborative feedback; and work with editors and publishers. Series 2 (2017), To The Revolution, built on Season 1’s discussions and demonstrated how differently scholars approach, understand, and portray the events comprising the American Revolution. I highly recommend the Doing History Series to undergraduate and postgraduate students, but also to those pursuing their own non-academic research and writing.

The show notes accompanying each episode summarise the interview and include links to the interviewee’s work and other resources discussed during the episode. The show notes also helpfully link to complementary episodes of Ben Franklin’s World, allowing listeners to delve into other discussions around the topic.

Ben Franklin’s World has won many awards. It currently stands as the reigning best history podcast and performs in the top 7 percent of all podcasts. A key to the show’s success  is its accessibility. The podcast can be enjoyed by those inside and outside of academia. Covart’s goal with Ben Franklin’s World has always been to make great scholarly history available to people outside the profession—she has certainly achieved that goal, and the show goes from strength to strength.

 

Runaway Slaves in Britain: A New Database

The University of Glasgow’s Runaway Slaves in Eighteenth-Century Britain project has created a searchable database of over 800 newspaper advertisements placed by masters and owners seeking the capture and return of enslaved people who had escaped. Most of the runaways were of African descent, although some were from the Indian sub-continent and some were Indigenous Americans.

The database, which was launched this week, is fully searchable according to a wide range of criteria and includes full transcriptions and (where possible) reproductions of the advertisements. The Runaway Slaves project website also contains a wealth of background and interpretative material which will be helpful to anyone making use of the database.

As the project team note, the purpose of the database is not to replicate the objectification of enslaved people who were brought to eighteenth-century Britain as the enslaved property of white British men and women. Rather, the project team hopes that the advertisements will allow readers to explore and understand the people identified in the advertisements as historical subjects in their own right – as individuals who challenged their status and condition. The project team’s aim is that readers can use the database to uncover the individual stories of runaways, whose lives are “hidden within a few lines of faded newspaper print.” For a brilliant example of just how such lives can be unfurled from runaway advertisements, see Marisa Fuentes’ book, Dispossessed Lives (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016).

Click here to go to the Runaway Slaves in Eighteenth-Century Britain Database.

 

The Irish in Latin America: An exhibition

In February this year, Irish President Michael D. Higgins opened an exhibition in Havana, Cuba celebrating the role of Irish immigrants in Latin America and highlighting shared aspects of  Ireland and Latin America’s histories. The exhibition is curated by historian Margaret Brehony. Follow this link to the website for the Society for Irish Latin American Studies. The page includes the exhibition guide, and a further link to President Higgins’ speech in Havana.

The Irish in Latin America Exhibition

 

‘Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833’ by Daniel Livesay – Q&A and a book review

Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833

Click here to visit the Junto website and read the Q&A

The book has also been reviewed in detail at the Institute of Historical Research ‘Reviews in History’ site: Click here for the review

Review of the British Museum’s ‘A Revolutionary Legacy: Haiti and Toussaint Louverture’

For those lucky enough to be in London, the British Museum’s exhibition on Haiti and Toussaint is on for a couple more weeks. But before you make the trip to the Museum, you might want to read this exhibition review by Tabitha McIntosh, a research student who works on revolutionary Haiti. McIntosh is unimpressed by the Museum’s efforts in this exhibition, but argues that the “jumble of objects…demonstrates for visitors rather more than the Museum intended: that most of the material history of revolutionary Haiti is scattered around the globe and buried in the archives, institutions, and private collections of the Atlantic powers that vied—and vie—for dominance of the Caribbean.” The review is definitely worth a read!

 

 

 

Caribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age: Demystifying Digital History: A Caribbean Perspective

Click this link to see the video (+ slides) of Dr Debbie McCollin’s presentation, ‘Demystifying Digital History.’ Dr McCollin discusses digital history with a focus on the possibilities for scholarship on the Caribbean. http://ufdc.ufl.edu/AA00015557/00012

Hélène Huet

carribeanCaribbean Scholarship in the Digital Age is a webinar series showcasing digital and/as public research and teaching in Caribbean Studies. The series provides a collaborative space for professionals to share on projects and experiences to foster communication and support our shared constellations of communities of practice.

Please join us for an upcoming event, Demystifying Digital History: A Caribbean Perspective, April 9, 2018, 11am-12pm (Miami Time).

Presenter: Dr. Debbie McCollin

Click here to participate in the online event: https://zoom.us/j/3982941835

About the Presentation:

As History and the Humanities at large came increasingly under threat in the latter 20th and 21st century new avenues were being sought to legitimise and modernise the subject areas to ensure their continuity. The use of the cyberworld, the maximisation of digital technology to support this goal, was seen as the answer to a small cadre of Caribbean scholars. However, with a Caribbean society and…

View original post 516 more words

Monumental Louverture: French/Haitian Sites of Memory and the Commemoration of Abolition

Another great Caribbean-focused post on the Age of Revolutions Blog.

Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Race and Revolution” series.

By Nathan H. Dize

In May 2017, France celebrated its eleventh day commemorating the Abolition of Slavery. Throughout the Republic, mayors gave speeches and placed wreaths of flowers   before statues and plaques in homage of key figures in the history of abolition.[1] In many cities, this meant honoring Toussaint Louverture, the leader who led his compatriots in the Haitian Revolution until he was arrested, deported, and imprisoned in France from August 1802 until his death in April 1803.  However, the French Republic has done little to recognize the circumstances that led to Louverture’s death on French soil as part of these commemorative celebrations.

Monuments to Louverture often only include mention of the oft-cited “tree of liberty,” his abolitionism, or that he “died in France.” Statues and plaques of Toussaint Louverture in Bordeaux, Grenoble, and in the Château…

View original post 1,734 more words

CFP: ‘Co-dependent Empires’: 2nd Annual Conference of Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy — Imperial Entanglements

13-14 July 2018, Museo Histórico de Acapulco ‘Fuerte de San Diego’, Acapulco, Mexico Conference Theme: The historiography on empires and imperial rivalries is abundant. The stories of the rise and fall of Rome, Carthage, Persia, Byzantium, Portugal, Spain, France, Britain, etc., are all well worn territory for a variety of historians. Empires have been compared […]

via CFP: ‘Co-dependent Empires’: 2nd Annual Conference of Imperial Entanglements: Trans-Oceanic Basque Networks in British and Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy — Imperial Entanglements

A letter from Mary Williamson to her former owner: History Workshop

History Workshop has published an 1809 letter written by a formerly enslaved woman, Mary Williamson, to her former owner in Jamaica. I know from my own research that uncovering the voices of women in the Caribbean past is extremely difficult, and it is even more so when it comes to enslaved women. Take a look at the letter over on the History Workshop website here