A month of history podcasts: May 2017

The past month for me has involved trying out a few new history-related podcasts, some better than others, some more Trump-focused than others. I salute the efforts by historians to attempt to integrate the current seismic shift in American diplomacy, policy & the presidency by drawing historical parallels (and contrasts) – but I must admit I’ve actively sought to escape current affairs of late.  I’ll list a couple of podcasts here which do seek to historicise the current US administration, as well as some others I’ve discovered this month.

Letters of Complaint. This is a series of short episodes, part live-action, part discussion, which explore the grievances of Sydney’s 19th century residents. The City of Sydney historian Dr Lisa Murray delves into the City’s archives to reveal the best, worst and most bizarre letters of complaint. Click here for the website for the podcast, but you can also download the series on iTunes and elsewhere.

Just Words. This Australian series was released a few months ago amidst the (repeated) debate about section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act. The podcast examines a number of the legal cases  which have been brought under the section. It seems the debate has now been put to rest (fingers crossed), but these episodes serve as a really interesting examination of the history of a piece of Australian legislation, and its impact on the litigants and the wider public. I highly recommend the podcast – in particular the first few episodes. Click here for the podcast on iTunes, although it’s available via all the usual apps as well.

The Outlander Podcast, Episode 199 is an interview with the cast and production team for 1745. I wrote about this film in a post on my Caribbean Histories blog. That post also has links to the work of a team of historians at the University of Glasgow investigating runaway slaves in Scotland. The podcast interview is well worth a listen. The story in the film is fascinating, and as the writers mention, there is so much research yet to be done. I think it’s brilliant that this invisible history is being brought to the big screen.

The Whiskey Rebellion. This is a podcast series hosted by Frank Cogliano and David Silkenat, both historians of America based at the University of Edinburgh. The episodes I’ve listened to do tend to draw upon the current American presidency, but then explore events and figures in the American past. Click here for the Whiskey Rebellion site.

The Lawfare Podcast. This is for when I do want to hear about the goings-on at the White House. The episodes tend to be long, but in-depth, and feature some senior and experienced people with seemingly considered viewpoints. The podcast series is hosted by Lawfare, a website devoted to American national security, law and policy. This isn’t a history podcast, but appeals to the ex-lawyer/regulator in me. Click here for the Lawfare podcast site

I have to say my favourite find this month was this short interview with Jill Lepore about the evolution of Wonder Woman and her connection to feminism. Lepore is a brilliant writer and historian (one of my favourites), and is the author of The Secret History of Wonder Woman. Lepore is probably the best historian I know at relating the excitement of the process of archival research and the moment of discovery. She’s a very entertaining speaker—this is the kind of escapism I’d been seeking all month!

 

How to subscribe to a podcast. Subscribing simply means that whenever a new episode of a podcast is released, it will appear on your podcast app of choice, on your phone, iPad, computer etc. Click here to go to a how-to article written by one of my favourite (non-history) podcasters, Gretchen Rubin. The article explains how to subscribe to Rubin’s Happier podcast, but the steps she describes can be followed for any podcast. The article explains how to subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud, using either your computer or your iPhone or android phone. I hope this helps!

 

A month of history podcasts: April 2017

This is the first of what I hope will be a regular post with links to history-related podcasts I’ve listened to over the past month.

Some podcast series are well-established and not hard to find—such as Ben Franklin’s World or Stuff You Missed in History Class  but in a more recent trend, academic conferences and seminars are often being recorded and released online as podcasts. But these can be harder to find.

As always, I thrive on feedback from readers and listeners. If any of the podcasts I link to have interested you, or inspired you, please tell me! Also, please share with me any history-related podcasts you have discovered so that I can add them to my list.

* Please see the end of this post for a how-to guide for subscribing to podcasts*

1. Professor David Armitage, “Civil Wars: A History in Ideas.” A paper given at a seminar entitled “Partition and Civil Wars in Ireland 2020-2023: Civil Wars and Their Legacy” at Queen’s University Belfast, 10 March 2017. Armitage introduced his new book (Civil Wars: A History in Ideas) and traced the history of the idea of civil war from Cicero to Syria.

2. Paul Revere’s Ride Through History. This is the latest instalment in the ‘Doing History’ Series on Ben Franklin’s World, which focuses on how historians work. This episode focuses on why it is that historians have focused on Paul Revere’s ride on 18 April 1775, and not on the many other significant rides he took? Why is it that Revere seems to ride quickly into history and then just as quickly out of it? A great feature of the series is the additional resources – related to each episode – which are available on the Omohundro Institute’s website.  Click here to access the episode.

3. ‘Cuba is already ours:’ annexationists, filibusterers, & the US struggle to buy Cuba, 1820-1898. Dr Carrie Gibson, author of Empire’s Crossroads, which I reviewed here, recently gave a paper at University College Londons Institute of the Americas on the US’s many attempts to buy Cuba from Spain throughout the nineteenth century.

4. Mike Duncan is back with a new Revolution! Since 2013, Duncan (an historian, author, and podcaster) has produced a number of podcast series, each focusing in depth on a different revolution in the past. In march, his sixth series launched – focusing on the July Revolution in France (1830). Duncan focuses on timelines, and often goes into great detail about people, places and the order of events—not as much analysis as the other podcasts listed above, but the podcasts make for great listening and are very popular.

Click here to see Revolutions podcast in iTunes and here for Duncan’s website, which includes some images, maps and further commentary. Also, I linked to a previous series on the Haitian Revolution on my CaribbeanHistories blog here.

5. Last but not least, some Australian content from the Dictionary of Sydney. Lisa Murray, the Historian of the City of Sydney discussed an exhibition at the Australian Museum which highlights the work of two of the most prominent natural history illustrators in 19th Century Australia, Harriet and Helena Scott. Click here to see the accompanying blogpost at the Dictionary of Sydney – once there, click the ‘Listen Now’ button. If you explore the blog, you’ll find links to other podcasts from the Dictionary team.

How to subscribe to a podcast.

Subscribing simply means that whenever a new episode of a podcast is released, it will appear on your podcast app of choice, on your phone, iPad, computer etc. Click here to go to a how-to article written by one of my favourite (non-history) podcasters, Gretchen Rubin. The article explains how to subscribe to Rubin’s Happier podcast, but the steps she describes can be followed for any podcast. The article explains how to subscribe on iTunes and Soundcloud, using either your computer or your iPhone or android phone. I hope this helps!

Caribbean Histories: A New Blog!

Screen Shot 2017-02-09 at 2.43.20 pm.pngOver the summer, I ‘launched’ a new blog: Caribbean Histories. That sounds rather formal, but I wanted somewhere to share all the links and book notes I’ve kept over the past couple of years related to Caribbean history. I’ve discovered to my surprise that Caribbean history is somewhat under-appreciated. It’s dispersed between accounts from various perspectives and languages—including the European empires which had a hold on the region for so long, pre-Columbian perspectives, and more recently the African diaspora. And then there is the diversity within the region itself.  For my thesis I’m approaching it from a British/Irish perspective, which I know is only one of the myriad ways the history of the region can be approached. I hope that by sharing my finds, I can help those interested in Caribbean history to dig deeper. The blog is not pitched necessarily at the academic, rather I hope to spark interest in a more general reader. For example, high school or university students seeking deeper knowledge or help with a research topic, or travellers heading to the region for a holiday. If you know someone this could help out—please share!

Head on over to Caribbean Histories… and as always, I’d be very appreciative of feedback.

One of my favourite blogs of 2016 – the Australian Women’s History Network

VIDA blog Managing Editors Ana Stevenson and Alana Piper reflect on the year and share VIDA’s Top 10 posts for 2016. 2016 in review As we come to the end of the year, we at VIDA wanted to reflect on the … Continue reading → The post Top 10 for 2016 appeared first on Australian Women’s…

via Top 10 for 2016 — Australian Women’s History Network

Long weekend in Dublin

 

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I returned from a long weekend in Dublin a week ago – I was delighted to be able to attend a symposium at Trinity College organised by David Dickson: ‘Ireland and the Caribbean in the Age of Empire.’ The 5-day round trip from Sydney was somewhat crazy but the symposium was so well put-together, with so many ‘big’ names in this emerging field, that it was well worth the jetlag. Many of those of us who presented have been inspired by Nini Rodgers’ Ireland, Slavery and Antislavery, so it was wonderful that she could be at the gathering—in closing proceedings she told us how delighted she is by the direction research is taking in this area, and is amazed at the array of sources scholars are drawing together. I was also rather chuffed that she recalled our chance meeting 18 months ago in the Linen Hall Library in Belfast.

It was wonderful to see papers presented by (among others) Jenny Shaw, Matt Reilly, Jonathan Wright and Orla Power – all of whom I have already cited in my in-progress PhD thesis. There were so many other interesting papers covering Irish connections with the Caribbean in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. A handful of fascinating papers also touched on interactions with the Spanish empire in the Caribbean. I have dreams of reviving my Spanish skills and exploring those connections in the future.

Many papers took a biographical/microhistorical approach, as I’m doing. A stand-out for me was a paper by Tom Truxes on the value of the British National Archives’ High Court of Admiralty Prize Papers—anyone who’s read the Bordeaux-Dublin Letters 1757 will have an inkling of the type of documents available in the collection. Truxes explained that there are over 4,000 boxes of mostly uncatalogued court records, personal correspondence, commercial documents, shipping papers etc at Kew… so potential dissertation-writers without a topic and with access to Kew—go check out the prize papers! I would if I lived in London.

I presented my work-in-progress on my merchants and planters chapter. I discussed John Black of Ulster/Grenada/Trinidad, and James Watt of Ramelton/Barbados/Jamaica. I was followed on my panel by Jonathan Wright who also presented on Mr Black, and then David Fleming who spoke on Eyre Coote, a Governor of Jamaica. Both papers were excellent, and really helped me think about my approach as I write up my second chapter.

Next week I’m off to my first Irish Studies Australia/NZ Conference, to present much the same paper as I did in Dublin. I’m looking forward to getting the lay of the land in Irish Studies in Australia & promise to report back soon.

References:

Nini Rodgers, Ireland, Slavery and Anti-Slavery:1612—1865 (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).

The Bordeaux-Dublin Letters 1757: Correspondence of an Irish Community Abroad, edited by L.M. Cullen, John Shovlin and Thomas M. Truxes (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013)

 

 

 

 

 

Going on a bear hunt

BearsParents out there, and maybe some younger readers, will recognise this line: “We can’t go over it, we can’t go under it, Oh no! we’ve got to go through it!” The line has been going around and around in my mind the past couple of weeks.  On a global scale, my challenges are miniscule – but nonetheless they have ebbed away at my steady PhD research-and-writing habits so that I find myself almost entirely out of the way of working now. I can’t quite believe I’ve let it get to this stage.  I really need to get words on the page. I find myself forcing my way through excuses – I’ve just got to go through it. I wish I could summon up the energy and drive I had as I studied for all those law exams so many years ago – I remember making clear sacrifices back then (not going to footy matches for a few weeks before exams, not going out on Friday nights – I remember those ones!), but I now find making sacrifices very very hard. I’ve just got to go through it.

My aim by the beginning of December is to finish my draft introduction and literature review, and a second chapter on plantation/merchant life which I’ve almost finished researching.  Perhaps putting that aim in writing on this blog will impel me towards the finish line! I really want to have some proper, guilt-free time off over Summer.

I’ll end this post with a quote I heard from Ira Glass on the Happier podcast this week. This hints at the “we’ve got to go through it” sentiment, but with a positive promise of better things to come…

“Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.”

History isn’t a ‘useless’ major

The argument for history (and the humanities in general) as a sound basis for an undergraduate education is well-known amongst historians,  but I sometimes wonder if the wider non-history-loving public ever hears it and ever gives it any thought. James Grossman, the executive director of the American Historical Association published this OpEd in the LA Times, which I think puts the argument very succinctly: happy reading and please share this article amongst your networks, especially those outside the history fraternity.

History isn’t a ‘useless’ major

 

The Historians: ABC702 Sydney

Just a quick follow-up to my post last week about James Valentine’s weekly radio slot in Sydney which he’s calling ‘The Historians’…. I was duly alerted by my non-historian friend that there was an historian on the radio this week again – it was Associate Prof Frank Bongiorno from ANU who had some insights into the Australian conscription debates during World War I. The segment is available for a few more days HERE, and starts at about 1:04:00.

Let’s find out if historians can talk!

As I’ve written here before, I’m an avid podcast-listener, and I’m a fan of Liz Covart’s format in Ben Franklin’s World. For those of you who haven’t listened, BFW is a weekly podcast in which the host (Liz) interviews an historian of early America about their research. The podcast has a loyal subscriber base, and is approaching its landmark 100th episode, which is a wonderful achievement as most podcasts don’t get into double figures.

I’m convinced that there is enough material in Australia to support a weekly conversation with an historian – I guess the question is whether there is the listener/subscriber base. This is something I’ve thought about pursuing after I get through my PhD. So  I was delighted to hear this week that James Valentine, a radio host with ABC702 in Sydney kicked off just such a conversation with Associate Professor Clare Wright from LaTrobe University. What was even better for me was that I heard about this not from anyone in the history fraternity, but from friends in my exercise class…so there’s a small listener base excited about this already! Valentine’s stated aim is to have a weekly conversation with an historian on his afternoon radio show to discuss their research and current debates in history. He wants to talk with historians of Australia and beyond. His pitch for the segment was that we hear from journalists, writers and social commentators on history—but not a lot from historians.* He’s keen to find out if historians can talk!

You can listen to Valentine & Wright’s conversation HERE. It goes from 1:28:00 until about 1:50:00. (Unfortunately this recording will disappear after a few days, but if I find it elsewhere I’ll update the link.) Dr Wright talked generally about what she loves about researching history—about the detective work involved and the adrenaline of the chase that keeps her going back to the archives. She then talked about her own current research, which is an expansion of the work she did on the Forgotten Rebels of Eureka. She’s now looking at mining history in Australia from pre-invasion to the (doomed) 2012 Mining Resources Rent Tax.

*In Australia, this may have something to do with the virulent nature of popular debate around what came to be known as the Australian history wars, but that’s another story.

By the way, Dr Wright co-convened a great symposium on history and the media in 2013 – to revisit some of the discussions there, link here to the symposium blog.