‘The Caribbean: A Brief History’ by Gad Heuman

Caribbean Histories: Resources for learning about the Caribbean Past

This book is the best place to start for an overview of Caribbean history. It’s a quick, easy read, designed to take the reader from early modern times in the Caribbean, almost up to the present. This is no mean feat, as the Caribbean is a broad canvas – the histories of every island, let alone the wider region are varied and often tortured. Heuman’s years of studying and writing about the Caribbean have enabled him to draw together these many histories into a comprehensible narrative. This book includes the islands of the region, as well as the mainland territories of the Guianas (Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana) and Belize in central America.

In this second edition, Heuman has included new material on indigenous Caribbean societies before the arrival of Columbus, which takes the starting point for this book back earlier than many histories of the region. Given Heuman’s specialisation, there…

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‘Empire’s Crossroads: A History of the Caribbean from Columbus to the Present Day,’ by Carrie Gibson

Caribbean Histories: Resources for learning about the Caribbean Past

Empire’s Crossroads provides a broad survey of modern Caribbean history, with a pleasing level of detail. Gibson zooms in to tell stories about the people and places of the Caribbean, but also guides the reader in making thematic connections across the region. She also places the Caribbean’s traumatic past in context. As she notes at the outset, the  modern Caribbean (from 1492 onwards) is the product of an encounter between Europeans and other peoples.

Over the course of this 350-page book, Gibson pieces together the history of the West Indies (which includes here not just the islands but the Latin American countries bordering the Caribbean Sea) – a history which has long since fragmented. As she explains, the history has been fragmented partly because historians are usually grouped by language or by their own imperial past – so the history of the formerly British, French and Spanish elements do not always take account of…

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‘A Parcel of Ribbons’ by Anne M. Powers

Caribbean Histories: Resources for learning about the Caribbean Past

A Parcel of Ribbons contains an extraordinary collection of letters, spanning over fifty years, together with Anne Powers’ editorial commentary. The Lee letters were preserved by Robert Cooper Lee, a child sailor who left England for Jamaica with a parcel of ribbons to sell in 1749. He returned to England 22 years later a very wealthy man, having made his fortune as an attorney.  The letters touch upon personal, family, business and political matters. Together with Powers’ commentary, they provide wide-ranging insights into the social, cultural and business history of Jamaica and England in the eighteenth century. The letters are held privately, but with their publication in this book, they comprise a valuable primary resource, now available to researchers.

Lee married a mixed-race creole woman. In a move very unusual at that time, he took her back to England with him where they married. Relationships between European men and coloured women were not…

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‘The Colour of Shadows: Images of Caribbean Slavery’ by Judy Raymond

Caribbean Histories: Resources for learning about the Caribbean Past

024_bookshelf_143.jpgThe Colour of Shadows centres on the life and career of Richard Bridgens, the artist and planter who published West India Scenery in 1836. Many of the drawings from  West India Scenery are well-known, but as Raymond explains, Bridgens himself is a little-known character. Before moving from England to Trinidad in 1826, Bridgens had a successful career as an artist and furniture-maker and is known to historians of that milieu.  When his wife inherited a stake in the St. Clair plantation in Trinidad, the young family crossed the Atlantic to take on the life of the sugar planter. In documenting the world around him, however, Bridgens didn’t draw his peers in the colonial hierarchy, or the life he led, but instead he depicted the enslaved people who worked on his estate, documenting the conditions under which they lived and worked, and the new creole culture they were beginning to create.

Judy…

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A month of history podcasts: May 2017

The past month for me has involved trying out a few new history-related podcasts, some better than others, some more Trump-focused than others. I salute the efforts by historians to attempt to integrate the current seismic shift in American diplomacy, policy & the presidency by drawing historical parallels (and contrasts) - but I must admit …

A month of history podcasts: April 2017

This is the first of what I hope will be a regular post with links to history-related podcasts I've listened to over the past month. Some podcast series are well-established and not hard to find—such as Ben Franklin's World or Stuff You Missed in History Class  but in a more recent trend, academic conferences and seminars are often …

Caribbean Histories: A New Blog!

Over the summer, I 'launched' a new blog: Caribbean Histories. That sounds rather formal, but I wanted somewhere to share all the links and book notes I've kept over the past couple of years related to Caribbean history. I've discovered to my surprise that Caribbean history is somewhat under-appreciated. It's dispersed between accounts from various perspectives …

One of my favourite blogs of 2016 – the Australian Women’s History Network

VIDA blog Managing Editors Ana Stevenson and Alana Piper reflect on the year and share VIDA’s Top 10 posts for 2016. 2016 in review As we come to the end of the year, we at VIDA wanted to reflect on the … Continue reading → The post Top 10 for 2016 appeared first on Australian Women's… …