What I’ve been reading and listening to: March

Sunday 1 March feels like a year ago! That was the day my family explored a suburb of Sydney we’d never been to before (Haberfield) and vowed to explore more every couple of weeks… fast forward to 1 April and we’re staying home except for my local #walk20in20 and the occasional grocery shopping trip.

To reading though…I read a lot about the COVID19 pandemic for a couple of weeks, but am now limiting myself to one news fix per day.

My reading this month wasn’t that inspiring to be honest, but the trajectory is kind of interesting. I started with Lucy Treloar’s Wolfe Island, which is beautifully written, but got me down in a climate change/end of the world way. Little did I know a pandemic was just around the corner, to put my fear of the damage of climate change on the back burner!! Next was The War that Saved my Life which I read on my 12 year old’s recommendation. It was a nice change of pace from Treloar’s book (although the subject matter is quite sad). It was also illuminating to see what ‘the kids’ are reading about historical events these days.

I went to a bookshop to buy Dan Ziffer’s A Wunch of Bankers, couldn’t find it and picked up Too Big to Fail instead. I thought it’d be interesting to read about the last global financial fiasco, ten years down the track. I speed-read much of it (too much detail and breathless gossip) and now I can’t bring myself to finish it. I know how it ends, and now that we’re in the midst of another fiasco, I’ve lost interest!

A Different Kind of Subject is my nod to academic reading this month, which has been completely disrupted by all the upheaval of transiting to full-time work and school from home. Hunter’s book on colonial law in Aboriginal-European relations in 19th century Western Australia is really useful for the research I’m doing on Richard Madden’s time in Western Australia.

In addition to my regular podcasts*, I enjoyed The Eleventh this month. It’s an Australian version of Slate’s Slow Burn series about Nixon and Watergate. The Eleventh that delves into the events leading up to the dramatic dismissal of the Whitlam government on 11 November 1975. Most Australians have heard Whitlam’s ‘Well may we say God save the Queen…’ quote. Despite knowing probably more than your average person about the events, I learnt a lot from the podcast, and it was fascinating hearing extended interviews with people involved at the time.

*My regulars include: Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Happier in Hollywood, the Daily and Satellite Sisters. I’m loving all of these at the moment… particularly the Satellite Sisters who are keeping me sane with lots of laughs 🙂

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